Archive for 2006

“Taking Games Seriously” – Spring 2006 DC Area Technology & Humanities Forum scheduled for May 15

Friday, April 21st, 2006

Taking Games Seriously: The Impact of Gaming Technology in the Humanities
Monday, May 15th from 4-6pm, Car Barn 316, 3520 Prospect St. NW, Georgetown University

Please join Michelle Lucey-Roper (Federation for American Scientists) and Jason Rhody (National Endowment for the Humanities) for a discussion moderated by Mark Sample (George Mason University) on gaming and the humanities. Discussion will center on gaming and its implications for education; thinking about ways to exploit aspects of video game technology to create innovative learning spaces; and games as a possible conduit to online archives or museum collections.

Michelle Lucey-Roper is the Learning Technologies Project Manager for the Discover Babylon Project and the Digital Promise Project at the Federation of American Scientists (FAS) in Washington, DC. She has created and managed several technology projects and research initiatives that helped to improve public access to primary source materials. While working towards her doctorate on the interaction of word and image, Lucey-Roper researched and designed curricula for a wide range of subject areas and created new information resources. Before joining FAS, she worked as a librarian, teacher and most recently at the Library of Congress as a research associate. She earned her B.A. at Trinity College, Hartford, CT; her M.A at King’s College, London; and received a doctorate from Oxford University.

Jason Rhody, a Ph.D. candidate in the Department of English at the University of Maryland, is currently writing his dissertation, entitled Game Fiction. He has taught courses and given conference presentations on new media, electronic literature, and narrative. He currently works on a web-based education initiative, EDSITEment, for the National Endowment for the Humanities. He previously worked for the Maryland Institute for Technology in the Humanities, an institute dedicated to using technology to enable humanities research and teaching. Jason writes about games and literature on his blog, Miscellany is the Largest Category.

Mark Sample teaches and researches both contemporary American literature and New Media/Digital Culture, and he is always exploring how literary texts interact with, critique, and rework visual and media texts. His current research projects include a book manuscript on the early fiction of Don DeLillo and Toni Morrison, exploring their engagement with consumer culture, particularly how they use what Walter Benjamin calls “dialectical images” to reveal the latent violence of everyday things. Another project concerns the interplay between video games, the War on Terror, and the production of knowledge. Professor Sample received an M.A. in Communication, Culture, and Technology from Georgetown University (1998) and his Ph.D. from the University of Pennsylvania (2004).

The forum will be held on Monday, May 15th from 4pm to 6pm at Georgetown University in the Car Barn. There will be an informal dinner after the forum, at a cost of $10 per person. Street parking around campus is severely limited and strictly enforced by the DC police and the DC Department of Public Works. Most streets require a Zone 2 residential permit issued by the District of Columbia for parking for longer than two hours. A limited number of metered spaces are available on Reservoir Road, 37th Street and Prospect Street. For those up for a short walk, the Southwest Garage is accessible from Canal Road or Prospect St. The nearest metro station is Rosslyn, across Key Bridge. You must RSVP for dinner by May 8th.

Co-sponsored by the Center for New Designs in Learning & Scholarship (CNDLS) at Georgetown University and George Mason University’s Center for History and New Media (CHNM), the DC Area Technology & Humanities Forum explores important issues in humanities computing and provides an opportunity for DC area scholars interested in the uses of new technology in the humanities to meet and get acquainted.

Mason Basketball Digital Memory Bank

Thursday, March 30th, 2006

The Mason Basketball Digital Memory Bank is now live at http://hoops.gmu.edu.

With their first trip to the Final Four in school history, Mason is enjoying what is undoubtedly its finest season. The Patriots have won an NCAA Tournament game for the first time, set a school record with 27 wins, and defeated a pair of top-10 teams (Connecticut and North Carolina) for the first time in the history of the University.

The Patriots’ Cinderella story has made George Mason the focus of national attention, with Mason Fever spreading across the country. It is difficult to gauge what result the Patriots’ historic run will have on the University, but its impact will undoubtedly be felt.

As Patriot hoops make history, our historians are helping fans become a part of the story. By posting online their memories and media files of this momentous run to the Final Four, fans around the world can become a part of this important process. Our stories, as a component of this digital archive, will become part of a living history.

This project builds on prior work by George Mason University’s Center for History and New Media, and other partners such as the Library of Congress and the Red Cross, to collect and preserve history online, especially through the ECHO project, the September 11 Digital Archive, and the Hurricane Digital Memory Bank. It is part of a growing practice of using the Internet to preserve the past through “digital memory banks.”

Please spread the word about the Mason Basketball Digital Memory Bank and please be sure to visit hoops.gmu.edu and tell us your experience (or show us your experience in photos) with George Mason’s unbelievable run in basketball and be a part of online history!

Go Patriots!

Cohen and Rosenzweig on Death of Multiple-Choice Exams

Friday, March 17th, 2006

CHNM staffers Dan Cohen and Roy Rosenzweig have published an article in the Feb. 24, 2006 issue of the Chronicle of Higher Education on the implications of Cohen’s H-Bot software, and of similar data-mining services and the web in general. “No Computer Left Behind” argues that just as the calculator – an unavoidable modern technology – muscled its way into the mathematics exam room, devices to access and quickly scan the vast store of historical knowledge on the Internet (such as PDAs and smart phones) will inevitably disrupt the testing – and thus instruction – of humanities subjects. As the editors of the Chronicle put it in their headline: “The multiple-choice test is on its deathbed.” This development is to be praised, Cohen and Rosenzweig argue; just as the teaching of mathematics should be about higher principles rather than the rote memorization of multiplication tables, the teaching of subjects like history should be freed by new technologies to focus once again (as it was before a century of multiple-choice exams) on more important principles such as the analysis and synthesis of primary sources. You can read their article in the CHNM History and New Media essays repository.

Women in World History Recognizes National Women’s History Month

Friday, March 10th, 2006

In recognition of National Women’s History Month, CHNM’s NEH-funded Women in World History website would like to announce its imminent completion. Women and World History provides free access to primary sources about women across all time periods and world cultures – valuable resources for incorporating information about the myriad ways women have shaped world history into classrooms, lectures, and libraries. Download a flier to display.

Women in World History Announces Online Forum

Wednesday, March 1st, 2006

CHNM is happy to announce that our Women in World History project will host the last in its series of four month-long online forums in March 2006, Women in Asia.

These forums give world history teachers the chance to talk about ways to teach issues surrounding women and gender in world history, and how to access classroom resources, including online primary sources. An educator with high school classroom experience and a historian moderates each forum. Each forum is an accessible email listserv that allows all participants to post comments and see all responses.

The forum begins March 1: Women in Asia, moderated by Dorothy Ko (Barnard College) and Kurt Waters (Virginia Public Schools).

To Register for the Women in Asia forum, subscribe (join) via e-mail:

1.Address an e-mail message to ude.u1398416340mg.vr1398416340estsi1398416340l@vre1398416340stsil1398416340

2.Put the following in the body of the message: subscribe WOMENINASIA-L yourfirstname yourlastname

A confirmation message will be sent to your e-mail address asking you to confirm your subscription request. You must reply to this message with “ok” in the body of the message. Leave the subject unchanged.

Once you have subscribed to the list, you can post messages to the list by sending e-mail to ude.u1398416340mg.vr1398416340estsi1398416340l@L-A1398416340ISANI1398416340NEMOW1398416340

For more information see http://chnm.gmu.edu/wwh/forum.html

For help registering contact ude.u1398416340mg.mn1398416340hc@hw1398416340w1398416340

CHNM’s Sheila Brennan discusses Hurricane Digital Memory Bank

Friday, February 10th, 2006

KOLE radio in Beaumont, TX will feature CHNM’s Hurricane Digital Memory Bank on Friday, February 10 between 3 and 4 pm (CST). Fox Forum host Dan Gresham will interview Hurricane Digital Memory Bank Project Manager, Sheila Brennan, and will take calls during that time. Listeners may tune into 1340 or 1380 AM, or listen to a streamed broadcast online.

Cohen on Illinois Public Radio

Tuesday, February 7th, 2006

On Friday, February 3, CHNM’s Director of Research Projects, Dan Cohen appeared on Illinois Public Radio’s Focus 580 to discuss his recent book, Digital History and other topics in history and new media. The entire interview is now available as an MP3 file from WILL’s website.

Women in World History Announces Online Forum

Tuesday, January 24th, 2006

CHNM is happy to announce that our Women in World History project will host the third in its series of four month-long online forums in February 2006, Women in Latin America.

These forums give world history teachers the chance to talk about ways to teach issues surrounding women and gender in world history, and how to access classroom resources, including online primary sources. An educator with high school classroom experience and a historian moderates each forum. Each forum is an accessible email listserv that allows all participants to post comments and see all responses.

Our third forum begins February 1: Women in Latin America, moderated by Donna Guy (Ohio State University) and Sharon Cohen (Maryland Public Schools).

To Register for the Women in Latin America forum:

Subscribe (join) via e-mail:

1.Address an e-mail message to ude.u1398416340mg.vr1398416340estsi1398416340l@vre1398416340stsil1398416340

2.Put the following in the body of the message:

subscribe WOMENINLATINAMERICA-L yourfirstname yourlastname

A confirmation message will be sent to your e-mail address asking you to confirm your subscription request. You must reply to this message with “ok” in the body of the message. Leave the subject unchanged.

Once you have subscribed to the list, you can post messages to the list by sending e-mail to ude.u1398416340mg.vr1398416340estsi1398416340l@L-A1398416340CIREM1398416340ANITA1398416340LNINE1398416340MOW1398416340

For more information see http://chnm.gmu.edu/wwh/forum.html

For help registering contact ude.u1398416340mg.mn1398416340hc@hw1398416340w1398416340

CHNM on CNN

Tuesday, January 17th, 2006

On Friday, January 13, CNN’s “The Situation Room with Wolf Blitzer” featured CHNM’s Hurricane Digital Memory Bank. Internet reporter, Jacki Schechner, enthusiastically highlighted the Hurricane Digital Memory Bank’s efforts to collect the stories and memories of the 2005 hurricane season.

CHNM Launches Hurricane Digital Memory Bank

Monday, January 9th, 2006

In an effort to collect, preserve, and present the stories and digital record of Hurricanes Katrina, Rita, and Wilma, The Center for History and New Media has launched the Hurricane Digital Memory Bank. A collaboration with the University of New Orleans, the Hurricane Digital Memory Bank brings together a diverse network of regional and national partners including the Smithsonian Institution’s National Museum of American History and the Louisiana State Museum to collect and preserve first-hand accounts, on-scene images, blog postings, podcasts, and other digital materials related to the devastating Gulf Coast storms of 2005. In addition to aiding historical efforts, the Hurricane Digital Memory Bank aims to foster some positive legacies by allowing the people affected by these storms to tell their stories in their own words, which as part of the historical record will remain accessible to a wide audience for generations to come.

Funded by a generous grant by the Alfred P. Sloan Foundation, the Hurricane Digital Memory Bank builds on prior work by the Center for History and New Media and other partners to collect and preserve history online, especially through the Echo: Exploring and Collecting History Online – Science, Technology, Industry project and the September 11 Digital Archive. It is part of a growing practice of using the Internet to preserve the past through “digital memory banks.”

Download the press release.

Archives by Year:

About

Since 1994, the Center for History and New Media at George Mason University has used digital media and computer technology to democratize history—to incorporate multiple voices, reach diverse audiences, and encourage popular participation in presenting and preserving the past. We sponsor more than two dozen digital history projects and offer free tools and resources for historians. Learn More

Featured Project

Teachinghistory.org

Teachinghistory.org is the central online location for accessing high-quality resources in K-12 U.S. history education. Explore the highlighted content on our homepage or visit individual sections for additional materials.