username: password:

CREDITS

Since 1994, the Center for History and New Media (CHNM) at George Mason University has used digital media and computer technology to democratize history—to incorporate multiple voices, reach diverse audiences, and encourage popular participation in presenting and preserving the past.

In addition to the CIP Digital Archive, CHNM sponsors or hosts more than a dozen other digital projects, including The September 11 Digital Archive, The Lost Museum, ECHO, The Western Civilization Webography Project, The 1970 Hard Hat Riots, History News Network, the Journal of Social History and the award-winning History Matters website. For more information, visit the Center for History and New Media website.

Project Staff

Kathi Ann Brown is founder of Milestones Historical Consultants, Charlottesville, Virginia. Brown holds an M.A. in History from George Mason University. A specialist in corporate history, she is the author of several business histories, including The Spirit to Serve: Marriott’s Way (co-authored with J. W. Marriott, Jr.) and Wired to Win: Entrepreneurs of the American Cable Industry. In addition to her work on the CIP Digital Archive, she wrote Critical Path: A Brief History of Critical Infrastructure Protection in the United States, a book soon to be published by the CIP Oral History Project.

Rebecca Luria is a research associate with the CIP Oral History Project. On behalf of the project, she conducted nearly 50 interviews with leading public policy makers and industry leaders, including members of the President’s Commission on Critical Infrastructure Protection (PCCIP). Luria was also instrumental in creating the timeline for the website and contributing to the archive. She also brought her research skills to bear on Critical Path: A Brief History of Critical Infrastructure Protection in the United States. She has an M.A. in international policy from GMU and a B.A. in anthropology from Guilford College.

Jim Safley is Web Programmer and Digital Archivist for the Center for History and New Media at George Mason University. He received his bachelor's degree in history from George Mason University and is currently working towards his master's degree in American history. His archival career includes posts at the National Archives and Records Administration, records manager at Phi Beta Kappa national headquarters, and archivist assistant at GMU's Special Collections and Archives. Affiliated with CHNM since 2002, Safley applies traditional archiving experience to his work in digital archiving, web programming, and database administration. His work at CHNM includes the September 11 Digital Archive, Echo: Exploring and Collecting History Online, as well as the CIP Digital Archive.

Roy Rosenzweig is Mark and Barbara Fried Professor of History & New Media and Director of the Center for History and New Media at George Mason University. He is co-author, with Elizabeth Blackmar, of The Park and the People: A History of Central Park, which won several awards including the 1993 Historic Preservation Book Award and the 1993 Urban History Association Prize for Best Book on North American Urban History. He also co-authored, with David Thelen, The Presence of the Past: Popular Uses of History in American Life, which has won prizes from the Center for Historic Preservation and the American Association for State and Local History. His other single-authored and collaborative works include Eight Hours for What We Will: Workers and Leisure in an Industrial City, 1870-1920, the multimedia CD-ROM, Who Built America?, and edited volumes on history museums, history and the public, history teaching, oral history, and recent history.

Tom Scheinfeldt is Research Assistant Professor of History and Assistant Director of the Center for History and New Media at George Mason University. He received his bachelor's degree from Harvard and his master's and doctoral degrees from Oxford, where his doctoral thesis examined the public role of science history and science museums in the inter-war period. Scheinfeldt has lectured and written extensively on the history of popular science, the history of museums, history and new media, and the changing role of history in society, and has worked on traditional exhibitions and digital projects at the Colorado Historical Society, the Museum of the History of Science in Oxford, the National Museum of American History, and the Library of Congress. Scheinfeldt currently manages several online history projects at the Center for History and New Media, including Echo: Exploring and Collecting History Online - Science, Technology, and Industry and the September 11 Digital Archive.