This article and the accompanying chart are provided by IntellectualCapital.com
which is a service mark of A2S2 Digital Projects, Inc.

The Year of the Woman Voter

by Ellen R. Malcolm (Ellen Malcolm is President of EMILY's List.)

The following article and the accompanying chart of voters by year and sex,
by Ellen Malcolm, President of EMILY'S List, demonstrates that in 1992
women voters turned out in record numbers. This was "The Year of the Women".
Women voters, dismayed by the all-male panel of senators at the Thomas nomination
hearings went to the polls the next year in record numbers.


 In 1992 more than 60 million women voted, helping to elect 24 new women to the
House and five to the Senate, the largest increase in history. When 16
million of these women voters chose to stay home on election day 1994, Republicans
gained control of the Congress for the first time in 40 years. Now these same women
voters are poised to play a decisive role in the outcome of both the presidential and
congressional contests.

Gauging the gender gap

Since March EMILY's List has been conducting a national tracking poll of women
voters every six weeks called the Women's Monitor. The October poll found that
women support President Clinton by a margin of 56 to 35 percent. Among men,
President Clinton has a 6-point lead over Bob Dole. Drop-off women voters, women
who stayed at home in 1994, have emerged as both overwhelmingly Democratic and
motivated to vote, creating a new element in the 1996 elections. EMILY's List, in
conjunction with state Democratic parties, has initiated the WOMEN VOTE! Project, a
multi-year program that will identify contact and mobilize these drop-off women voters

The Women's Monitor indicates that races for Congress are too close to call. However, it
is clear that women voters could create victory for Democrats in the House. The Monitor
shows that women support generic Democratic congressional candidates 44 to 35 percent
over Republicans, while men support Republican candidates by a 4-point margin.

It looks like the 105th Congress will see the return of all the Democratic women
incumbents running for reelection. While not matching the increases of 1992, we
can expect the second largest increase in the number of women ever elected to
Congress. We think we will see a sixth and maybe a seventh woman elected to the
Senate and at least one new Democratic woman governor.

Contract on Newt

If 1992 were the Year of the Woman and 1994 the Year of the Angry White Male;
1996 will surely be remembered as the Year of the Woman Voter. Issues that are
important to women, like Medicare, education, the environment and a renewed
commitment to protect the right to choose, have been at the forefront of the
political discussion this year. The Women's Monitor shows women voters feel
confident that a Democratic-led government will do a better job of dealing with
these issues.

Just over a year ago, women voters began to move away from Newt Gingrich and
the GOP House as they shut down the government and tried to impose deep cuts in
education. On election day, women will turn their disagreement into a political
reality creating Democratic victories for men and women candidates up and down
the ticket.



VOTER TURNOUT IN PRESIDENTIAL ELECTIONS

Presidential Election Year
% of Voting Age Population Who Reported Voting
Number Who Reported Voting

1992

1988

1984

1980

1976

1972

1968

1964

Women
Men
62.3 %
60.2%
58.3%
56.4%
60.8%
59.0%
59.4%
59.1%
58.8%
59.6%
62.0%
64.1%
66.0%
69.8%
67.0%
71.9%

 

Women
Men

60.6 million

53.3 million

54.5 million

47.7 million

54.5 million

47.4 million

49.3 million

43.8 million

45.6 million

41.1 million

44.9 million

40.9 million

41.0 million

38.0 million

39.2 million

37.5 million

VOTER TURNOUT IN NONPRESIDENTIAL ELECTIONS


Non-Presidential Election Year
% of Voting Age Population Who Reported Voting
Number Who Reported Voting

1994

1990

1986

1982

1978

1974

1970

1966

Women
Men
44.9 %
44.4%
45.4%
44.6%
46.1%
45.8%
48.4%
48.7%
45.3%
46.6%
43.4%
46.2%
52.7%
56.8%
53.0%
58.2%

 

Women
Men

44.6 million

40.4 million

43.3 million

38.7 million

42.2million

37.7million

42.3 million

38.0 million

36.3 million

33.3 million

32.5 million

30.7 million

33.8 million

32.0 million

31.8 million

30.7 million

Source: Center For the American Women and Politics



History 122
Hill/Thomas
HIST 122 Syllabus

End of Page.