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Narrative of the Operations and Recent Discoveries within the Pyramids, Temples, Tombs, and Excavations in Egypt and Nubia
Belzoni, Giovanni

When Europeans “rediscovered” Egypt beginning in the late 1700s, they did so with most dramatic effectiveness when they did so on the stage of ancient Egyptian ruins. Tomb robbers, treasure hunters, scientists, archaeologists – over the years the names changed to reflect both the changing tasks undertaken by the outside arrivers to the Nile Valley, and the amount of spin control put on those... [more]

Essay on the Metaphysics of Architecture
J. Dowson

Some of the most visible examples of nineteenth-century American Egyptomania were in the field of architecture. Nineteenth-century America was home to many buildings built specifically to emulate the monumental buildings of ancient Egypt. Known today as the Egyptian Revival, this style of architecture was closely related to other nineteenth-century styles intentionally based on ancient styles;... [more]

Cleopatra Before Caesar
Jean-Leon Gerome

The visual arts were one of the most active sites for nineteenth-century American Egyptomania. Because so many of the discoveries in nineteenth-century Egyptology were visual in nature – ancient ruins, massive structures, stone carvings, even hieroglyphics – and because these discoveries took place in striking natural areas – deserts, oases, river valleys – painters and other illustrators found... [more]

Sword Dance Before a Pacha
Jean-Leon Gerome

The visual arts were one of the most active sites for nineteenth-century American Egyptomania. Because so many of the discoveries in nineteenth-century Egyptology were visual in nature – ancient ruins, massive structures, stone carvings, even hieroglyphics – and because these discoveries took place in striking natural areas – deserts, oases, river valleys – painters and other illustrators found... [more]

The Serpent Charmer
Jean-Leon Gerome

The visual arts were one of the most active sites for nineteenth-century American Egyptomania. Because so many of the discoveries in nineteenth-century Egyptology were visual in nature – ancient ruins, massive structures, stone carvings, even hieroglyphics – and because these discoveries took place in striking natural areas – deserts, oases, river valleys – painters and other illustrators found... [more]

The Moorish Bath
Jean-Leon Gerome

The visual arts were one of the most active sites for nineteenth-century American Egyptomania. Because so many of the discoveries in nineteenth-century Egyptology were visual in nature – ancient ruins, massive structures, stone carvings, even hieroglyphics – and because these discoveries took place in striking natural areas – deserts, oases, river valleys – painters and other illustrators found... [more]

View in a Greek Dwelling
Jean-Leon Gerome

The visual arts were one of the most active sites for nineteenth-century American Egyptomania. Because so many of the discoveries in nineteenth-century Egyptology were visual in nature – ancient ruins, massive structures, stone carvings, even hieroglyphics – and because these discoveries took place in striking natural areas – deserts, oases, river valleys – painters and other illustrators found... [more]

Donkey-Boy at Cairo
Jean-Leon Gerome

The visual arts were one of the most active sites for nineteenth-century American Egyptomania. Because so many of the discoveries in nineteenth-century Egyptology were visual in nature – ancient ruins, massive structures, stone carvings, even hieroglyphics – and because these discoveries took place in striking natural areas – deserts, oases, river valleys – painters and other illustrators found... [more]

Turkisch Women Bathing/Turkish Women at the Bath
Jean-Leon Gerome

The visual arts were one of the most active sites for nineteenth-century American Egyptomania. Because so many of the discoveries in nineteenth-century Egyptology were visual in nature – ancient ruins, massive structures, stone carvings, even hieroglyphics – and because these discoveries took place in striking natural areas – deserts, oases, river valleys – painters and other illustrators found... [more]

The Great Rameses
Unknown

The story of American Egyptomania is often one of rather freewheeling imagery. Pyramids, sphinxes, pharaohs, slaves, science, magic, secrets, revelations – all could be combined in almost infinite number of unpredictable ways, making for an almost endless number of variations. This was, in fact, one of Egyptomania’s biggest draws: for every person interested in narrowing down the specific... [more]

Handy-Bandy and Nadia-Nadyr in their Oriental Mysteries
Unknown

Sex sells, and in Egyptomania, the question of which came first – the sex or the mania – was impossible to answer. With Egyptomania came a whole host of already-packaged exotic erotic sexual images: slave women, harem girls, “Oriental” temptresses, even Cleopatra herself. In fact, so attached to one another were advertisements for Egyptian attractions and images of sex and exotic sexuality... [more]

Wizard of the Sphinx
Unknown

As popular as ancient Egypt was in nineteenth-century cultural circles considered “respectable” or “highbrow” – such as archaeology, history, linguistics, or even architecture – it was at least as popular in social areas decidedly more democratic. Popular culture of all sorts was quick to seize on images and discourses of ancient Egypt and use them as forms of knowledge and entertainment. In... [more]

The Dancing Girl
Jean-Leon Gerome

The visual arts were one of the most active sites for nineteenth-century American Egyptomania. Because so many of the discoveries in nineteenth-century Egyptology were visual in nature – ancient ruins, massive structures, stone carvings, even hieroglyphics – and because these discoveries took place in striking natural areas – deserts, oases, river valleys – painters and other illustrators found... [more]

Circassian at the Watering-Trough
Jean-Leon Gerome

The visual arts were one of the most active sites for nineteenth-century American Egyptomania. Because so many of the discoveries in nineteenth-century Egyptology were visual in nature – ancient ruins, massive structures, stone carvings, even hieroglyphics – and because these discoveries took place in striking natural areas – deserts, oases, river valleys – painters and other illustrators found... [more]

Gerome: Introductory and Critical
Earl Shinn ["Edward Strahan"]

The visual arts were one of the most active sites for nineteenth-century American Egyptomania. Because so many of the discoveries in nineteenth-century Egyptology were visual in nature – ancient ruins, massive structures, stone carvings, even hieroglyphics – and because these discoveries took place in striking natural areas – deserts, oases, river valleys – painters and other illustrators found... [more]

World-Noted Women; Or, Types of Womanly Attributes of All Lands and Ages
Mary Cowden Clarke

The 1850s saw an explosion of American interest in the figure of Cleopatra. Poems, paintings, sculptures, and novels all were written with the Egyptian queen at their center, but the main form accounts of Cleopatra took during this decade was biography. Short or book-length, praising or damning, sanitized or scandalous, biographical studies of Cleopatra were hugely popular and sold regularly,... [more]

Washington Monument: Shall the Unfinished Obelisk Stand a Monument of National Disgrace and National Dishonor?
Norton Chipman

The Washington Monument in Washington, D.C., is probably the most famous and iconic example of Egyptian Revival architecture in American history. Designed by South Carolina architect Robert Mills in 1836 but not completed until 1884, the Monument is modeled after a classic ancient Egyptian obelisk, but is stripped of any external markings and expanded in size, standing a bit over 555 feet in the... [more]

The Ancient Architecture of America
R. Cary Long, A.M.

The origins of American archaeology are far from a stately and orderly affair. The discovery of the remains of ancient civilizations in Egypt in the 1800s sparked enormous interest in similar remains all over the world, this was especially true in the case of ruins, those most visible of past cultures lost to the sands of time. Such ancient structures were often seen to challenge received... [more]

Washington Monument Monograph As Designed by Henry S. Searle, Architect, Washington, D.C.
Henry S. Searle

The Washington Monument in Washington, D.C., is probably the most famous and iconic example of Egyptian Revival architecture in American history. Designed by South Carolina architect Robert Mills in 1836 but not completed until 1884, the Monument is modeled after a classic ancient Egyptian obelisk, but is stripped of any external markings and expanded in size, standing a bit over 555 feet in the... [more]

The Slave Market
Jean-Leon Gerome

The visual arts were one of the most active sites for nineteenth-century American Egyptomania. Because so many of the discoveries in nineteenth-century Egyptology were visual in nature – ancient ruins, massive structures, stone carvings, even hieroglyphics – and because these discoveries took place in striking natural areas – deserts, oases, river valleys – painters and other illustrators found... [more]