Ecology, environment, disease (Movement of biota and microbes) images

Eckhout, Albert, Mameluke with a basket of flowers, 1641. Albert Eckhout was the first European painter in Brazil. Eckhout was an official painter, hired by Johan Maurits van Nassau-Siegen, a prince of the House of Orange. These paintings tell us much about Brazil in the first half of the seventeenth century, and but also about the activities of the Dutch, and Dutch perceptions of the colony. The reason why they were there was to grow sugar – so it was a colony with slaves. The background of this painting shows the sugar cane plantation, but does not show the slaves that laboured there. This is typical of colonial painting, which tended to depict an idealised picture of the New World.
Eckhout, Albert, Mameluke with a basket of flowers, 1641.
Albert Eckhout was the first European painter in Brazil. Eckhout was an official painter, hired by Johan Maurits van Nassau-Siegen, a prince of the House of Orange. These paintings tell us much about Brazil in the first half of the seventeenth century, and but also about the activities of the Dutch, and Dutch perceptions of the colony. The reason why they were there was to grow sugar – so it was a colony with slaves. The background of this painting shows the sugar cane plantation, but does not show the slaves that laboured there. This is typical of colonial painting, which tended to depict an idealised picture of the New World.

 

Eckhout, Albert, Brazilian Fruit, circa 1610 – 1666.
Eckhout, Albert, Brazilian Fruit, circa 1610 – 1666.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Glover, John, My Harvest Home, 1835. Historian Jeanette Hoon argues that this painting not only celebrates the Tasmanian harvest, and the painter, John Glover’s own settlement in Tasmania, but it also celebrates the absence of indigenous people in the colonial landscape. When Charles Darwin visited Tasmania two years after this Glover painted My Harvest Home, he expressed a similar sentiment, remarking that ‘all of the aborigines have been removed to an island in Bass’s Straits, so that Van Diemen’s Land enjoys the great advantage of being free from a native population’.
Glover, John, My Harvest Home, 1835. Historian Jeanette Hoon argues that this painting not only celebrates the Tasmanian harvest, and the painter, John Glover’s own settlement in Tasmania, but it also celebrates the absence of indigenous people in the colonial landscape. When Charles Darwin visited Tasmania two years after this Glover painted My Harvest Home, he expressed a similar sentiment, remarking that ‘all of the aborigines have been removed to an island in Bass’s Straits, so that Van Diemen’s Land enjoys the great advantage of being free from a native population’.

 

Anonymous Port Jackson artist, Native Going to Fish with a Torch and Flambeaux, circa 1788 – 1797.  Like many pictures painted by members of the First Fleet, this painting depicts indigenous people using the land and its resources. (Image originally published on the Natural History Museum website, http://www.nhm.ac.uk).
Anonymous Port Jackson artist, Native Going to Fish with a Torch and Flambeaux, circa 1788 – 1797.
Like many pictures painted by members of the First Fleet, this painting depicts indigenous people using the land and its resources. (Image originally published on the Natural History Museum website, http://www.nhm.ac.uk).

 

 

 

 

 

 

Disease:

René Rambert 1800-1900). From the Bibliothèque Nationale, Paris. Also found in Quétel, pg. 129.
René Rambert 1800-1900). From the Bibliothèque Nationale, Paris. Also found in Quétel, pg. 129.

 

The Population History of STockholm 1721-1986. From 'Zivilis or Hygaeia: urban public health and the epidemiologic transition', Gerry Kearns. The Rise and Fall of Great Cities.
The Population History of Stockholm 1721-1986. From ‘Zivilis or Hygaeia: urban public health and the epidemiologic transition’, Gerry Kearns. The Rise and Fall of Great Cities.

 

 

 

 

 

Cullerier, Précis iconographique des maladies vénériennes, Bibliothè que Nationale, Paris. 1861.
Cullerier, Précis iconographique des maladies vénériennes, Bibliothè que Nationale, Paris. 1861.

 

The cholera in Egypt: quarintine examination in Brindisi. From the Wellcome Library, London.
The cholera in Egypt: quarintine examination in Brindisi. From the Wellcome Library, London.

 

 

 

 

 

Grand-Jouan, L'Assiette au beurre, 9 May 1903. Bibliothèque Municipale de Caen.
Grand-Jouan, L’Assiette au beurre, 9 May 1903. Bibliothèque Municipale de Caen.

 

Countries Reporting Cholera in 2011. From - http://gamapserver.who.int/mapLibrary/app/searchResults.aspx
Countries Reporting Cholera in 2011. From – http://gamapserver.who.int/mapLibrary/app/searchResults.aspx

 

 

 

 

 

Cholera Transmission. Image found at http://carta.anthropogeny.org/moca/topics/cholera
Cholera Transmission. Image found at http://carta.anthropogeny.org/moca/topics/cholera

 

Girl who died of Cholera. "Blue stage of the spasmodic cholera. Sketch of a girl who died of cholera in Switzerland, November, 1831." Found at: http://ihm.nlm.nih.gov/luna/servlet/detail/NLMNLM~1~1~101434245~139722:-Girl-who-died-of-cholera-?sort=Title%2CSubject_MeSH_Term%2CCreator_Person%2CCreator_Organization&qvq=q:cholera;sort:Title,Subject_MeSH_Term,Creator_Person,Creator_Organization;lc:NLMNLM~1~1&mi=79&trs=92
Girl who died of Cholera.
“Blue stage of the spasmodic cholera. Sketch of a girl who died of cholera in Switzerland, November, 1831.” Found at: http://ihm.nlm.nih.gov

 

 

 

Ramses V and smallpox. Found at: The history of smallpox Clinics in Dermatology, Volume 24, Issue 3, Pages 152-157 Alasdair M. Geddes
Ramses V and smallpox. Found at: The history of smallpox
Clinics in Dermatology, Volume 24, Issue 3, Pages 152-157
Alasdair M. Geddes

 

Smallpox victim in Africa WHO photo by J. Breman
Smallpox victim in Africa WHO photo by J. Breman