A Carnival of Revolution

A Carnival of Revolution

By Padraic Kenney

 

            In most of the books that we have read this semester we are given an analysis of revolutions, uprisings, tear-downs and revolts that have focused on those in charge and those with supposed power. The leaders and their governments are usually key players, each book tends to highlight the big names and the big events. Such is not the case with Carnival of Revolution By Padraic Kenney. This book focuses on smaller unpronounced groups and on some occasion’s individuals. Padraic Kenney seeks to look at the nonconformist groups and their sometimes unconventional means of revolution.

            One of the great things about this book is its use of oral history as a means of informing. I think that, while one must be careful as to the context that personal narratives are using, for the most part they are effective and meaningful when displayed in a academic text. By focusing on the people personally involved in the events we are able to get a more personal and in tact view of what happened. The author gives attention to underground groups and protest, where as some works just focus on the high level known movements. The important thing about these groups is that they decided to strike when they noticed that the regime was not fighting back as hard as it once had been. They took this sign of weakness as sign that the time to act had arrived. They used to weakness in major governments and institutions and used it against them. Coupling this notion with the personal narratives creates a interesting read, one which I thoroughly enjoyed.

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