Archive for December, 2007

A Memorial in Hungary

Monday, December 17th, 2007

This post is about a memorial dedicated to WWI veterans in Dunapataj, Hungary. While I was there a few weeks ago, I wrote some notes about it and copied down its inscription, with the intention of commenting on it in the blog.  I realize that it is a little late to post, but I promised myself at the beginning of the semester I would write something that involves translating Hungarian. This is my last chance, so here goes. (more…)

Reading Padraic Kenney’s A Carnival of Revolution : Central Europe 1989

Friday, December 14th, 2007

Posted by Misha Griffith.

Ernest Rutherford, the Nobel Prize winning physicist, once remarked “In science there is only physics; all the rest is stamp collecting.” (more…)

Final Paper – Religion in ECE Nationalism

Thursday, December 13th, 2007

    

Religion’s Role in Yugoslavia and Poland in the Twentieth Century: Evolution of Ethnoreligious Nationalism

by Gary E. Wightman

6 December 2007

                

Dr. Mills Kelly

Hist 635

 

            Religion has played an important role in national politics in East Central Europe during the twentieth century, at times serving the desires of the Church at the national or Papal level, at times serving the desire of the national leaders, at times serving the desires of both the Church and national leaders, and at times serving the advantages of one party at the disadvantage of the other party. Regardless of the benefactor or loser, the Church has been a factor in the nationalism equation during the 1900s,. Indeed, some outsiders have blamed religion as a major catalyst or contributor for some of the wars or atrocities during this period, such as the Holocaust and the Ustashe campaigns during World War II, as well as the Yugoslavian conflict in the 1990s, although some historians of late have refuted this statement to some degree regarding the Yugoslavian conflict. For instance, Donia and Fine in Bosnia and Hercegovina: A Tradition Betrayed, argue that the conflict is not a product of centuries of bad blood over religious conflict and wars in former Yugoslavia. The meaning of  nationalism of the nineteenth century has evolved into ethnonationalism for East Central Europe during the twentieth century in an effort to further refine the definition of Self and Other. Religion has not been relegated to insignificance during this evolution of nationalism. Indeed, religion has played an important role in the evolution of nationalism, so much so that some historians refer to the evolution of nationalism as ethnoreligious nationalism. To investigate this transformation and assess the role and impact of religion on nationalism in East Central Europe, and therefore, on communism, this paper will consider several events during the twentieth century, specifically focusing on the Polish struggle against the Communist regime during the 1980s and conflict in Yugoslavia since World War II. (more…)

The Balkans After the Cold War

Tuesday, December 4th, 2007

Beth Gryczewski

Gallagher, Tom. The Balkans After the Cold War:  From Tyranny to Tragedy. New York:  Routledge, 2003.

In contrast to the Lampe book, Yugoslavia as History: Twice There was A Country, where Lampe tends to lean towards the belief that the breakup of Yugoslavia was inevitable, and tends to blame outsiders for imposing their will on Yugoslavia, (AND, ultimately for the disastrous and bloody breakup of the country), Tom Gallagher, in The Balkans After the Cold War, asserts that the disaster in Yugoslavia was purely the fault of insiders (2). “Yugoslavia unravelled as a functioning entity between 1985 and 1991 largely as a result of decisions taken by internal political actors, not as a result of unfriendly external actions” (2). 

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Bosnia: A Short History

Sunday, December 2nd, 2007

Bosnia: A Short History by Noel Malcolm

Noel Malcolm’s work Bosnia: A Short History is a brief, yet expansive, history of the Eastern European country, inextricably linked with the devastation in the former Yugoslavia. However, Malcolm approaches the region from a much different perspective than many of his contemporary scholars. Malcolm perceives the region not as an inevitable cauldron of political instability and violence, rather as one that was plunged into violence, counter to most of it history. Malcolm’s observations are comprehensive, drawing on all sorts of academic disciplines, like archaeology, to demonstrate his thesis. Ultimately, Malcolm concludes the aggression evident in the region is NOT a result of “ancient, tribal loyalties” but rather as a result of pre-meditated Serbian propaganda and aggression. (more…)

My Trip to Hungary

Sunday, December 2nd, 2007

                I’m writing this blog post about my trip to Hungary about a month ago. I wish I could say that I was on vacation, but I went for a funeral. Still, I noticed a few things there that relate to our class, so I thought I would write about them in the blog. First, I should give a little background.

                I stayed in a small town Dunapataj (pronounced with a y-sound at the end, not with a hard j-sound) in the south of Hungary. I should also mention Ordas (pronounced Ordush, with a sh-sound at the end), which is next door. They have grown together. I have family and friends in both, with my grandparents’ house in Dunapataj. The topics that follow have to do with both towns, their inhabitants, and small town life in Eastern Europe, which fascinates me. (more…)