Archive for the ‘News’ Category

Welcome, Wikipedia Affiliate

Wednesday, March 5th, 2014

We are very pleased indeed to announce the appointment of Gary M. Greenbaum as Wikipedia Affiliate at the Roy Rosenzweig Center for History and New Media. Mr. Greenbaum is an experienced Wikipedia editor and administrator who, under the username “Wehwalt,” has taken over a hundred Wikipedia articles to Featured Article status. Mr. Greenbaum has frequently contributed significantly to history-related Wikipedia articles on such topics as President Nixon’s Checkers speech, William Jennings Bryan’s Cross of Gold speech during the 1896 presidential election, and the life and career of the Civil War abolitionist congressional representative Thaddeus Stevens.

During his one-year affiliation with RRCHNM, Mr. Greenbaum will conduct scholarly research using the library resources of George Mason University in order to improve the accuracy and reliability at least 25 Wikipedia articles on historical topics, especially articles on historical figures with a Virginia connection such as Harry F. Byrd. Mr. Greenbaum will work in consultation with Professor Mills Kelly during his affiliate year.

The Wikipedia Affiliate position at RRCHNM has been created in partnership with The Wikipedia Library project, whose mission is to help active Wikipedia editors gain access to the vital reliable sources that they need to do their work. The University of California at Riverside is also planning to host a “Wikipedia Visiting Scholar,” and we hope that other universities will join this effort to improve Wikipedia’s reliability and accuracy by helping to provide Wikipedia editors with access to scholarly resources.

Join the Digital Humanities Now FeedFest, and help us keep our RSS feeds up to date!

Monday, February 24th, 2014

Amanda Morton

Using the Pressforward plugin, DHNow pulls content from a collection of RSS feeds and allows Editors-at-Large to preview, sort, and nominate content for the editorial staff to review. In order to keep DHNow as current and as involved in conversations within the DH community as possible, we rely on readers to nominate RSS feeds to add to the plugin via a link on DHNow.

In the wake of the redesign and reorganization of digitalhumanitiesnow.org, however, we have the opportunity to more directly engage with DHNow’s community of readers and twitter followers. This week, beginning on February 24, we are calling for blog and resource submissions via twitter (@dhnow), as well as through the submission form on the DHNow homepage. We’re all hands on deck to take your suggestions, put them into the plugin, and make DHNow more current and more reflective of our readership’s interests.

Digital Humanities Now works best when members of the community jump in as Editors-at-Large and as part of a twitter community that retweets and disseminates posts. We hope that this call for submissions will help us engage with our established readers and twitter followers, and that it will expand our awareness of and participation in the larger DH community. We also hope that this push will allow the content on DHNow to become more representative of on-going work and opportunities in the digital humanities. So what are your favorite sites for DH news, work, and debates? Let us know

New Online Resource: Sea of Liberty

Tuesday, February 18th, 2014

From the Magna Carta to the Arab Spring, the quest for greater liberty and self-government has shaped history. Through a partnership between the Roy Rosenzweig Center for History and New Media and the Thomas Jefferson Foundation, which owns and operates Monticello, educators and students now have access to liberty-related resources through the Sea of Liberty — an interactive online tool for teaching, exploring, and sharing the power of Jefferson’s ideas.

solVisitors to Sea of Liberty can explore documents, letters, artwork, photographs, and videos related to the ideas of liberty, freedom, and self-governance. The core of the collection includes images and quotes from the Monticello exhibit, The Boisterous Sea of Liberty. The exhibit traces the development and ongoing influence of Jefferson’s transformational ideas about liberty, particularly those expressed in the Declaration of Independence. Sea of Liberty expands on the exhibit, providing new relevant content and tools to explore it.

Registered users can build their own collections and then use the items to create activities and projects. A special teacher dashboard allows educators to create and assign activities, or “challenges,” that focus students on specific themes or objects in the collection. Students and the public respond to challenges by using items from their collection to create digital posters, word clouds, timelines, and digital stories. The projects can be shared to inspire others and promote dialogue. In addition, educators have access to resources related to teaching with primary sources, teaching historical thinking, and encouraging digital literacy.

Teachers contributed to the website’s development as part of Monticello’s Liberty Today Initiative, a series of summer institutes with educators from across the U.S. and beyond. Generous support of this project was provided by The Coca-Cola Foundation.

Applications Open for Doing Digital History, NEH Summer Institute

Wednesday, February 5th, 2014

Join us August 4-15, 2014 for Doing Digital History, a summer institute for mid-career American historians, sponsored by the National Endowment for the Humanities, Office of Digital Humanities, run by RRCHNM faculty and visiting instructors.

Doing Digital History is designed to fill a much-needed gap for 25 established historians who need instruction and a professional learning community to engage with new media methods and tools.

We seek applications from a diverse pool of faculty, public historians, archivists, librarians, museum professionals, and independent scholars specializing in US history, who have had very limited or no training in using digital methods and tools, or in computing, and who lack a supportive digital community at their home institutions.

Take a peek at our proposed schedule, and apply today. Applications will be open until March 15, 2014.

Applications Open for “Rebuilding the Portfolio: DH for Art Historians”

Thursday, January 30th, 2014

Join us July 7-18, 2014 for Rebuilding the Portfolio: DH for Art Historians, a summer institute at the Roy Rosenzweig Center for History in New Media,supported by the Getty Foundation.

Rebuilding the Portfolio: DH for Art Historians is designed for 20 art historians, from different stages of their careers and from varied backgrounds, including faculty, curators, art librarians, and archivists who are eager to explore the digital turn in the humanities.

We seek applications from individuals who have had very limited or no training in using digital methods and tools, or in computing.

Take a peek at our proposed schedule, and apply today. Applications will be open until March 15, 2014.

Position announcement: Wikipedia Affiliate, Roy Rosenzweig Center for History and New Media

Thursday, December 19th, 2013

Position announcement: Wikipedia Affiliate, Roy Rosenzweig Center for History and New Media

In conjunction with The Wikipedia Library project, the Roy Rosenzweig Center for History and New Media (RRCHNM) at George Mason University is seeking applicants for a “Wikipedia Affiliate.” This is an unpaid, year-long, remote research position beginning March 1, 2014 and ending February 28, 2015 that entitles the affiliate to full library privileges at George Mason University, including proxied access to all online materials to which the GMU Libraries subscribe: more than 400 databases, thousands of scholarly journals and mainstream periodicals, and hundreds of ebooks. The position is designed to give research library access to a Wikipedia editor who does not currently have such access or who has only limited access to scholarly resources: the purpose of the position is to help improve Wikipedia’s reliability and accuracy by providing Wikipedia editors with access to the best scholarly information resources while providing a model for other universities to do likewise.

Qualifications

The affiliate will be an experienced Wikipedia editor with at least one year of regular activity contributing to Wikipedia on historical topics in any field, region, or period. The affiliate will also be a thorough researcher who is committed to improving Wikipedia articles by consulting and citing reliable, scholarly sources and who is a lucid writer of text for Wikipedia encyclopedia articles on historical topics. An undergraduate or graduate degree in History, Art History, or a related discipline is desirable but not required.

Position Description and Duties

During the affiliate year, the affiliate will conduct scholarly research using the library resources of George Mason University with the aim of significantly improving the accuracy and reliability at least 25 Wikipedia articles on historical topics, preferably articles within a particular historical scope (for example: modern Russian and Soviet history, U.S. Civil War history, the history of late imperial China). Near the end of the affiliate year, the affiliate will write a brief report listing the Wikipedia articles he or she has contributed to and improved over the course of the year, describing how his or her access to GMU library resources has helped increase the reliability of Wikipedia on this topic and analyzing whether the affiliate program could serve as a model for other universities. The affiliate will also be asked to give a brief talk on the same subject to RRCHNM, either in person or via a remote technology such as Skype.

Application Instructions

To apply, please send the following documents to Dr. Amanda French at ude.u1409579262mg@5h1409579262cnerf1409579262a1409579262 by January 20, 2014:

1. A standard résumé or curriculum vitae that also includes

  • a link to your Wikipedia profile and
  • at least three links to Wikipedia articles on historical topics that you have contributed to.

2. A cover letter that includes

  • a description of your background, including why you contribute to Wikipedia and what level of historical expertise and interest you have in which fields, regions, or periods;
  • a summary of what access you currently have (or don’t have) to research materials such as databases and scholarly journals;
  • an explanation of why you want to become a Wikipedia Affiliate to RRCHNM; and
  • a brief outline of the historical topic(s) and/or specific Wikipedia articles you would focus on during your affiliate year.

All applicants will be notified of the outcome of the search by the end of February 2014. The affiliate year will begin March 1, 2014.

About the Roy Rosenzweig Center for History and New Media

Since 1994 under the founding direction of Roy Rosenzweig, the Center for History and New Media (RRCHNM) at George Mason University has used digital media and computer technology to democratize history—to incorporate multiple voices, reach diverse audiences, and encourage popular participation in presenting and preserving the past. The center itself is a democratic, collaborative space where over fifty scholars, technologists, and researchers work together to advance the state of the art.

RRCHNM uses digital media and technology to preserve and present history online, transform scholarship across the humanities, and advance historical education and understanding. Each year RRCHNM’s many project websites receive over 20 million visitors, and over a million people rely on its digital tools to teach, learn, and conduct research.

George Mason University is a public research university located approximately 14 miles from Washington, D.C., with over 30,000 students. Global education and research are a fundamental part of the university’s mission to serve its diverse and international student body. RRCHNM is part of the Department of History and Art History.

About The Wikipedia Library

The Wikipedia Library connects Wikipedia editors with libraries, open access resources, paywalled databases, and research experts. We are working together towards 5 big goals that create an open hub for conducting research:

  • 
Connect editors with their local library and freely accessible resources
  • 
Partner to provide free access to paywalled publications, databases, universities, and libraries
  • 
Build relationships among our community of editors, libraries, and librarians
  • 
Facilitate research for Wikipedians, helping editors to find and use sources
  • Promote broader open access in publishing and research

The Wikipedia Affiliate to RRCHNM position is based on the Wikipedia Visiting Scholar idea suggested by Peter Suber at the Harvard Open Access Project.

Celebrate 20 Years of RRCHNM in November 2014

Monday, December 16th, 2013

Plans are taking shape for the upcoming conference to mark the 20th anniversary of the Roy Rosenzweig Center for History and New Media, November 14-­15, 2014. The conference will reflect the spirit of THATCamp: the first day will be spent hacking the history of RRCHNM, working collectively to tell the story of how projects were created and what they tell us about digital history’s past. The second day will feature short talks by invited guests, each followed by extended discussion, and unconference­-style breakout sessions.

We’re thrilled that Edward Ayers, Brett Bobley, and Bethany Nowviskie have agreed to share their thoughts on the future of digital humanities centers, while Tim Hitchcock, William Thomas, Kathryn Tomasek and a collective of GMU graduate students will offer visions of the future of digital history. We’re inviting all the fantastic folks who have worked with and at RRCHNM over the past two decades to celebrate with us.

You only turn 20 once, and we want to do this right. So, in 2014 we will focus on the 20th anniversary events. This means a hiatus for THATCamp Prime in 2014, but we’re already talking about ideas for 2015.

The 20th anniversary event is free and registration will open in early 2014. In the coming months, we will post additional information to the RRCHNM blog and tweet updates from @chnm, tagged #rrchnm20. We hope to see many of you in November.

Happy Anniversary, PressForward!

Thursday, November 7th, 2013

Happy Anniversary, PressForward! Funded by the Alfred P. Sloan foundation and based at George Mason University’s Roy Rosenzweig Center for History and New Media, the PressForward project was born two years ago with a mission to showcase the varied, dynamic, and provocative digital humanities scholarship published on the open web. To do this, the project has developed and nurtured two publications: Digital Humanities Now (DHNow) and the Journal of Digital Humanities (JDH). Those periodicals work hand in hand to surface gray literature and, at the same time, act as an experiment in open access publication. DHNow, developed four years ago and then relaunched as part of the PressForward initiative, is now published twice a week. Three times a year, JDH publishes a volume of articles culled from the material surfaced through DHNow, conferences, and other little-noticed online sources.  In addition, PressForward has been working to develop the tools necessary to disseminate literature that benefits digital humanities communities. We’ve worked to put those tools in the hands of groups like dh+lib, and watched with excitement as their publications grew.

The result of these efforts is a community of participants and practitioners that offer their time and talents each and every week. JDH and DHNow represent the labors of 175 editors, 100 authors, and ten faculty and graduate student staff members. But this anniversary, we also want to celebrate the readers that come to our sites each and every day. In 2013 alone, DHNow has seen more than 320,00 visits and 834,000 page views. During the month of October, more than ten thousand unique visitors came to that site. Though it is published far less frequently, JDH has seen more than 127,000 visits this year, with more than 414,00 page views. In September, it was able to keep pace with DHNow, welcoming nearly ten thousand unique visitors. If our research reveals anything, it’s the vibrancy and generosity of digital humanities communities.

In celebration of those communities, this second anniversary will see the launch of an outreach campaign that will bring you more detail about our methods. We’ve already redesigned the DHNow website for easier reading and participation, particularly with a new Editors-at-Large Corner. Through blog posts like this one, we’ll be sharing our research and conclusions. And this spring, we’ll roll out the PressForward WordPress plugin, a tool designed to make the task of curating and aggregating gray literature easier and more accessible, in hopes that this is only the beginning of the projects and publications that PressForward makes possible.

Be sure to watch @pressfwd for project updates and check out @dhnow and @journalofdh to follow digital humanities scholarship!

THATCamp Leadership & participad | DH Fellow’s Blog

Tuesday, October 22nd, 2013

Ben Hurwitz (2nd year Digital History Fellow)

On Thursday October 10, the Roy Rosenzweig Center for History and New Media and George Mason University welcomed DH’ers from around the globe to THATCamp Leadership 2013. For those of you who don’t know, THATCamp (The Humanities and Technology Camp) is an unconference series which was first held at George Mason in 2008. Since then, regional THATCamps have sprung up across the country and across several continents as well, hosted by universities or local DH communities.

THATCamp Leadership, generously sponsored by the Andrew W. Mellon Foundation, was quite different from a typical THATCamp. The invitation-only event partnered experienced THATCamp facilitators with academic and institutional leaders to discuss the future of THATCamp and the Digital Humanities generally. As a result, there were very few tech-centered sessions. Instead, broader session titles like “Building DH Locally,” “Sustaining and Altering THATCamp,” and “Digital Humanities and Online Education” predominated.

In the spirit of collaboration, THATCamp Leadership 2013 debuted a cooperative “notepad” space for recording discussions. Using participad, a WordPress plugin, the DH fellows at CHNM created notepads for each sessions and served as dedicated note-takers. Participants could view and edit their sessions notepads, or view another session’s notepad in order to follow discussions elsewhere in the conference. While some participants preferred to tweet, take notes on paper, or just focus on listening, we did have some encouraging contributions which added to the richness of the record. To view our notes from all of the sessions, look here, and feel free to comment as well.

George Mason University is Hiring a Digital Historian

Monday, October 21st, 2013

The George Mason University, Department of History and Art History invites applications for a tenure-track position in Digital History at the rank of Assistant Professor. While the historical field is open, candidates must have the ability to teach digital theory and methods at the undergraduate and graduate level, including a graduate course in programming (PHP, Python, Perl, Javascript, XML, for example). The teaching load is 2-2. Ph.D. must be in hand by August 2014.

George Mason University is a public research university located 14 miles from Washington, D.C., with approximately 30,000 students. The Department of History and Art History has a strong record of scholarly research and is home to the award-winning Roy Rosenzweig Center for History and New Media. The department also has the largest M.A. program in the country and a nationally ranked Ph.D. program.

Special Instructions to Applicants
For full consideration, please apply for position number F5343z at http://jobs.gmu.edu/. Complete the online faculty application and upload a letter of interest, CV, and a writing sample and/or a link to a digital project. Letters of reference should be sent separately to Professor Paula Petrik, Chair, Digital History Search, Department of History and Art History, George Mason University, MSN 3G1, 4400 University Drive, Fairfax, VA 22030. Review of applications will begin on November 15, 2013, and continue until the position is filled.

 

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About

Since 1994, the Center for History and New Media at George Mason University has used digital media and computer technology to democratize history—to incorporate multiple voices, reach diverse audiences, and encourage popular participation in presenting and preserving the past. We sponsor more than two dozen digital history projects and offer free tools and resources for historians. Learn More

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Teachinghistory.org is the central online location for accessing high-quality resources in K-12 U.S. history education. Explore the highlighted content on our homepage or visit individual sections for additional materials.