Archive for the ‘News’ Category

RRCHNM to Create Educational Materials for Eisenhower E-Memorial

Monday, April 20th, 2015

istilllikeikeThe Roy Rosenzweig Center for History and New Media (RRCHNM) is proud to announce its selection by the Dwight D. Eisenhower Memorial Commission to create educational materials for the Eisenhower E-Memorial.

RRCHNM will create seven curriculum units focused on Pivotal Moments from Eisenhower’s life: West Point, D-Day, NATO, The Presidency, Waging Peace, Little Rock, and NASA. Each unit will contain lesson plans for middle and high school classrooms, as well as related primary sources and activities. Additionally, RRCHNM will develop content for an interactive timeline of Eisenhower’s life and relevant moments in history.

“Our partnership with the Center for History and New Media at George Mason University will develop engaging teacher resource materials for the state of the art Eisenhower E-Memorial. We believe that today’s students will greatly benefit from learning about how President Eisenhower helped shape the world in which we live today,” commented Brigadier General Carl Reddel (Ret.), Executive Director of the Eisenhower Memorial Commission in Washington, DC.

RRCHNM has 20 years of experience developing free educational resources and working with teachers through professional development workshops both in-person and online. Last year, RRCHNM projects received over 24 million visits. Recent education projects include Teachinghistory.org, Sea of Liberty, and 100 Leaders in World (more…)

Growing the Fields

Thursday, April 2nd, 2015

Last summer, Sharon Leon and I (Sheila Brennan) led a team at RRCHNM with the challenging goal of increasing capacity within the fields of history and art history for doing digital work. We started with novices and invited them to learn with us for two weeks last summer. At the end, those digital novices transformed into ambassadors who are engaging with the growing community of digital humanities practitioners and who serve as advocates supporting digital history and digital art history work at their institutions and in the fields at large.

The Need

Recent studies conducted by Ithaka S+R document how historians and art historians are reluctant to engage in digital methods and to integrate those methods and related tools into their teaching. The cycle perpetuates itself as these established scholars are then unable to mentor graduate students or even to point them to appropriate training opportunities. These same scholars may also dissuade junior colleagues from pursuing digital work.

Doing Digital History 2014, NEH summer institute participants

Doing Digital History 2014, NEH summer institute participants

Even as digital work is receiving increasing recognition in academic circles, one major question remains for faculty interested in digital humanities and in new publishing mediums: will it count?

Despite decades of amazing work in digital (more…)

Teaching Hidden History

Thursday, February 19th, 2015

The Roy Rosenzweig Center for History and New Media is developing a new course, Teaching Hidden History, 4VAwith funding from
4-VA, an initiative dedicated to expanding educational opportunities and increasing collaborative research among Virginia universities.

A hybrid course, Teaching Hidden History features online components and in-person meetings utilizing the 4-VA Telepresence rooms on the Mason and Virginia Tech campuses. Students from both institutions will participate simultaneously.  The course integrates digital history, history education, and best practices in teaching and learning history. Students will conduct research using primary and secondary sources to develop online history modules using an open-source platform.  The first iteration of Teaching Hidden History will run in summer 2015.

In the changing higher education landscape, distance education has become increasingly common and attractive to institutions and students. Models for online education, however, have been dominated by science, math, and technology. Humanities disciplines have been slow to develop online educational opportunities, but they have the potential to incorporate and model best practices for inquiry-based, active learning.

Teaching Hidden History provides a unique opportunity for graduate students in history and social studies education to strengthen historical research and historical thinking skills while utilizing digital tools and exploring history education in an online environment.

Histories of the National Mall Wins Outstanding Public History Award

Thursday, February 12th, 2015

The National Council on Public History selected Histories of the National Mall as the winner of the 2015 Outstanding Public History Award. The award is presented each year for work that contributes to a broader public reflection and appreciation of the past or that serves as a model of professional public history practice.

The selection committee commended Histories for its clean design, and concluded “the site stands as an excellent destination for anyone interested in our nation’s Front Yard and as an outstanding example of how public historians can harness mobile technology to forge place-based historical connections.”

map_sliceHistories  is a place-based public history mobile website developed by RRCHNM with support of a grant from the National Endowment for the Humanities. Designed primarily for tourists in Washington, DC,  mallhistory.org reveals that the National Mall has a history of its own that is invisible when walking along its paths and lawns.  There are four different entry points– place-based, thematic, chronological, and biographical–allowing users to connect the physical space and its development, together with the social, cultural, and political events that have transpired there.

The project’s co-directors, Sheila Brennan and Sharon Leon will accept the award at the NCPH conference in April on behalf of the Center (more…)

Getty Foundation Funds Institute for Art History Graduate Students at RRCHNM

Tuesday, February 3rd, 2015

The_Getty_Foundation_logo_blue_highresWe are thrilled to announce that the Getty Foundation awarded a second grant to the Roy Rosenzweig Center for History and New Media to organize and run another summer institute in digital art history. This year, the Getty Foundation asked us to focus on graduate students in Masters and Doctoral programs.

Participants will learn from experienced RRCHNM and GMU faculty whose expertise span a range of digital humanities methodologies. Together with returning Project Co-Directors, Sheila Brennan and Sharon Leon, are Lisa Rhody, Stephanie Westcott, Lincoln Mullen, and Michele Greet.

“Building a Digital Portfolio” will run from July 13 to July 24, 2015 at George Mason University’s Fairfax campus. This institute is part of an ongoing initiative from the Getty Foundation to increase adoption of digital methodologies and use of digital tools across the fields of art history.

During the summer of 2014, RRCHNM ran a Getty-sponsored institute for established faculty, librarians, and museum professionals. Learn more about their experiences on the ReBuilding the Portfolio: DH for Art Historians website.

Applications will open Monday, February 9, 2015. If you wish to receive an email indicating applications have opened, leave your name and contact information on the form available on the “Building a Digital Portfolio” (more…)

Digital History Fellowships available for Fall 2015

Monday, December 15th, 2014

We’re pleased to announce that the Department of History & Art History at George Mason University has received another round of funding from the Provost’s PhD Award Program to admit two Digital History Fellows in each of the next three years.

Fellows enrolling in Fall 2015 will receive stipends of $20,000 for two years, during which time they will take a practicum course each semester here at RRCHNM, and then a further three years of support from the Department of History and Art History. The practicum courses provide an opportunity to be part of a digital history center and to contribute to a range of projects across all three of the Center’s divisions. Syllabi for the practicum courses can be found on the Fellows’ blog, which also includes posts by all three cohorts of fellows reflecting on their experiences at the Center.

Students interested in applying to the GMU History PhD program and being a Digital history Fellow, should consult the information on the department website or contact the department’s graduate director, Professor Cindy Kierner. Applications close January 15, 2015

In Memory of Michael Mizell-Nelson

Wednesday, December 10th, 2014

The Center recently learned that a long-time collaborator and friend, Michael Mizell-Nelson, passed away after a battle with cancer. He was a driving force behind the success of the Hurricane Digital Memory Bank (HDMB), and was a public historian committed to his hometown of New Orleans and to teaching and fostering civic activism in his students.

Two weeks after evacuating from New Orleans, a young Assistant Professor at the University of New Orleans (UNO) contacted Roy seeking advice for developing a documentary on Hurricane Katrina: the destruction, the responses (and lack thereof), and recovery. Roy discussed Michael’s ideas and the possibility of creating an online collecting project modeled after the September 11 Digital Archive with Center staff. Thankfully, the Sloan Foundation wanted to support an electronic collecting project. As Roy began to assemble a project team, he asked Michael to take the lead at UNO and to serve as the project’s Outreach Lead for what would become the Hurricane Digital Memory Bank: http://hurricanearchive.org/.

Michael and his community of colleagues, friends, and neighbors were profoundly affected by Hurricane Katrina and the second hit from Hurricane Rita a few weeks later. They struggled not only with physical destruction of place, but also with emotional trauma (more…)

RRCHNM20 Site Live

Tuesday, November 4th, 2014

We’re pleased to announce that the RRCHNM20 site is now live. This site is a collection of material about projects created by the Roy Rosenzweig Center for History and New Media at George Mason University in the first twenty years of its existence, 1994–2014.

This material has been gathered and made public to mark the Center’s anniversary, and to provide resources for the first day of the RRCHNM 20th Anniversary Conference (#rrchnm20), on November 14, 2014, which is devoted to hands-on work with Center projects—past and present.

Our aim in sharing this material is to provide insight on the process of creating digital history, and to highlight the roles of a range of staff and collaborators, across twenty years of changing structures, practices, concerns, hardware, and software.

RRCHNM20siteThe collection encompasses more than 60 of the 149 projects undertaken by the Center, as of November 2014. Not included are twelve current projects, as well as small contract and web design projects. Most of the documents are grant proposals and reports. We have removed the detailed budgets from these proposals, as well as letters of support and CVs; they are otherwise complete. The site also includes information on most of the just over 150 people who worked (more…)

100 Leaders Opens for Voting!

Monday, November 3rd, 2014

National History Day (NHD) and the Roy Rosenzweig Center for History and New Media (RRCHNM) announce the launch of the voting platform for 100 Leaders in World History (100leaders.org), a project sponsored by Kenneth E. Behring.

The site includes profiles of 100 leaders in world history selected by a panel of historians, teachers, and students in May 2014. Rate leaders on five qualities of leadership and compare your ratings with the panel and other voters.

The challenge for NHD and the RRCHNM team: How to invite people to think about different qualities of leadership in a meaningful way and explore the legacy of significant leaders?

The solution: a custom Drupal website with a jQuery slider for the rating interface.

100Leaders-Voting-Interface-2You decide whether each leader:

  • Articulates a vision;
  • Motivates others;
  • Makes effective decisions;
  • Confronts tough issues; and
  • Impacts history.

After each vote, the site introduces you to other leaders, some you may or may not know. You can also search by name or filter by time period, sphere of influence, or type of leader.

An introductory video explores the question: “What makes a leader?” Other videos present teaching strategies and a peek into the selection process.

100 Leaders in World History utilizes responsive design, allowing voting via desktop, laptop, tablet, or mobile device.

The website (more…)

CHNM‘s Histories: Digital History and Teaching History

Monday, October 27th, 2014

Cross-posted from Stephen Robertson’s blog. This is the second in a series of posts about aspects of RRCHNM’s history written to mark the Center’s 20th anniversary.

No sooner had I published my blog post on the differences between digital history and digital humanities than I realized that I had blurred a crucial difference between digital history and digital humanities: digital history has been far more focused on teaching than digital humanities. In my earlier post I collapsed teaching projects into the broader category of presenting material online; doing so masked a sharper distinction in activity around teaching. Digital humanities, while not unconcerned with teaching, has given it far less attention relative to research than digital history, and, that attention has focused on teaching digital approaches, methods and tools. By contrast, digital history has focused on teaching history, has been “engaged in the project of improving the quality of classroom teaching practices and learning outcomes,” as Steve Brier put it, by using digital media to develop resources and professional development for teachers of K-12 and undergraduate students. The scale and reach of these projects warrants far greater attention to them than they have received in discussions of digital humanities. RRCHNM’s earliest teaching project, History Matters, (more…)

Archives by Year:

About

Since 1994, the Center for History and New Media at George Mason University has used digital media and computer technology to democratize history—to incorporate multiple voices, reach diverse audiences, and encourage popular participation in presenting and preserving the past. We sponsor more than two dozen digital history projects and offer free tools and resources for historians. Learn More

Featured Project

Teachinghistory.org

Teachinghistory.org is the central online location for accessing high-quality resources in K-12 U.S. history education. Explore the highlighted content on our homepage or visit individual sections for additional materials.