Rosenzweig Forum on Technology and the Humanities: Preserving and Interpreting Born-Digital Collections

On Monday, April 22, from 6 p.m. to 7:30 p.m., the Library of Congress National Digital Information Infrastructure and Preservation Program (NDIIPP) will co-host the Rosenzweig Forum on Technology and the Humanities: Preserving and Interpreting Born-Digital Collections, as a special event in celebration of ALA’s Preservation Week 2013.

The forum will host four speakers. Presenters from the Smithsonian Institution Archives and the Library of Congress will talk about how their institutions are addressing the acquisition and preservation of born-digital collections. Kari Kraus from UMD will provide a perspective on scholarly and research use of these unique collections.

  • Riccardo Ferrante, Director of Digital Services & IT Archivist, and Lynda Schmitz Fuhrig, Electronic Records Archivist, Smithsonian Institution Archives on “More Than Just A Pretty Picture: Caring For and Sharing Of Born-Digital Collections at the Smithsonian”
  • Bertram Lyons, Folklife Specialist and Digital Assets Manager, American Folklife Center, Library of Congress on “Holistic Preservation for Living Archives: the StoryCorps collection at the American Folklife Center
  • Kari Kraus, Assistant Professor in the College of Information Studies and the Department of English at the University of Maryland on “‘We Leaned into the Platform’: Talking to Game Designers at the Top of Their Game

When: Monday, April 22, 6:00-7:30 pm
Where: Library of Congress, James Madison Building
Mumford Room, on the sixth floor
101 Independence Ave. S.E.
Washington, D.C

No RSVP required. Just show up!

For directions to the Library of Congress, see http://www.loc.gov/visit/directions/.

This event is free and open to the public. ADA accommodations should be made at least five days in advance at (202) 707-6363 or ADA@loc.gov.

Preservation Week—an initiative supported by the Library of Congress, the Association for Library Collections and Technical Services of the ALA, the Institute of Library and Museum Services, the American Institute for Conservation, the Society of American Archivists and Heritage Preservation—encourages libraries and other collection institutions to connect to our local communities and inspire action to preserve our collective heritage.

The Rosenzweig Forum for the Digital Humanities is named in honor of Roy Rosenzweig and is a collaboration of the Center for History & New Media (CHNM) at George Mason University, the Center for New Designs in Learning & Scholarship (CNDLS) at Georgetown University, and the Maryland Institute for Technology in the Humanities (MITH) at the University of Maryland.

Summer 2012: An Interview with Pamela Wright, Chief Digital Strategist, NARA

“One day, all of our records will be online. You can help make it happen,” proclaims the welcome screen of the National Archives and Records Administration’s Citizen Archivist Dashboard. The Citizen Archivist Dashboard is only one of many cool digital initiatives from “our nation’s attic”: you can learn more about these projects on Thursday, June 14, at 4pm at the Rosenzweig Forum on Technology and the Humanities, where Dr. Sharon Leon will be interviewing Pamela Wright, Chief Digital Strategist at NARA.

  • Rosenzweig Forum on Technology and the Humanities
  • Thursday, June 14, 4pm
  • George Mason University (Fairfax)
  • Johnson Center Meeting Room A (3rd floor)

This event is free and open to the public. For directions to George Mason University’s Fairfax Campus, see http://www.gmu.edu/resources/welcome/Directions/Directions-to-Fairfax.html.


View Larger Map

Spring 2010 Roy Rosenzweig Forum on Technology and the Humanities: The Library of Congress Twitter Archive

Beth Dulabahn, Director of Integration Management in the Office of Strategic Initiatives at the Library of Congress, will talk about the donation of the Twitter archive to the library. Beth was involved in the talks with Twitter and will provide some background and insight into this major digital acquisition. There will also be a general discussion of the value of the archive and related issues.

The Spring 2010 Rosenzweig Forum will take place Friday, May 21, at 3 pm, in Rm. 470 (the Center for History and New Media’s lab), in the Research I building, George Mason University (Fairfax Campus). Parking is available in the Sandy Creek Parking deck, right across from Research I. CHNM is on the 4th Floor. Directions to GMU: http://www.gmu.edu/resources/welcome/Directions-to-GMU.html.

All are welcome to attend!

2010 Rosenzweig Forum – Negotiating the Cultural Turn(s): Subjectivity, Sustainability, and Authority in the Digital Humanities

“Negotiating the Cultural Turn(s): Subjectivity, Sustainability, and Authority in the Digital Humanities”
— a conversation with Tim Powell and Bethany Nowviskie

Wednesday, February 17, 2010 from 4:30 to 6:30pm
Murray Room, Lauinger Library, Georgetown University

[Georgetown map] [Library map]

Tim Powell directs digital archive projects for the Ojibwe Indian bands of northern Minnesota, the American Philosophical Society, and the University of Pennsylvania Museum of Archaeology and Anthropology.  Tim will speak about a project entitled Gibagadinamaagoom (Ojibwe: “To Bring to Life, to Sanction, to Give Authority”) and how the focus on Ojibwe culture affects issues of intellectual property, open access, and the design of the interface, metadata, and database.

Bethany Nowviskie directs the University of Virginia Library’s efforts in digital research and scholarship, and is also associate director of the Mellon-funded Scholarly Communication Institute.  She will discuss a number of projects from UVA’s SpecLab, Scholars’ Lab, and NINES research groups related to the expression of subjectivity and perspective in interpretive digital environments.

Together (and as digital humanities scholars practicing outside of the typical tenure-track path), Tim and Bethany will address and open a conversation about issues of cultural authority, intellectual property, innovation vs. sustainability, objectivity, and the need to think outside the academy’s walls.


Sponsored and hosted by the Center for New Designs in Learning & Scholarship (CNDLS).

The Rosenzweig Forum for the Digital Humanities is named in honor of Roy Rosenzweig and is a collaboration of the Center for History & New Media (CHNM) at George Mason University, the Center for New Designs in Learning & Scholarship (CNDLS) at Georgetown University, and the Maryland Institute for Technology in the Humanities (MITH) at the University of Maryland.

2009 Roy Rosenzweig Forum – Social Networking and the Semantic Web

On Wednesday, May 13th at 7:00 p.m., the Rosenzweig Forum on Technology and the Humanities and the Washington Semantic Web Group will host the a forum on Social Networking and the Semantic web in the George Mason University Johnson Center Cinema. The forum will host four speakers, Mills Davis, Andy Roth, Mike Petit, and Dan Cohen, who will share their projects and lead a group discussion at the end of the evening. Mills Davis of Project10X will showcase new developments in social networking and semantic technologies within government and private industry. Andy Roth, Chief Quality Officer at AdaptiveBlue, will discuss Glue, a browser add-on that allows you to find new things based on what your friends like. Mike Petit will present Amplify, an open platform that mimics human understanding of content and offers a broad range of unique, and previously unavailable, data to SemWeb practitioners. Finally, Dan Cohen of the Center for History and New Media will discuss new social and collaborative features for Zotero, the  free, easy-to-use Firefox extension which helps collect, manage, cite and share your research sources.

More information, including speaker bios, is available at the Washington Semantic Web Meet-up  forum website.

Spring 2008 Rosenzweig Forum, Tuesday, March 11

On Tuesday, March 11 at 4:00-6:30 p.m., the Rosenzweig Forum on Technology and the Humanities welcomes Ken Price to College Park, MD to present:“Edition, Project, Database, Archive, Thematic Research Collection: What’s in a Name?”

Ken’s abstract: What are the implications of the terms we use to describe large-scale text-based electronic scholarship, especially undertakings that share some of the ambitions and methods of the traditional multi-volume scholarly edition? What genre or genres are we now working in? And how do the conceptions inhering in these choices of language frame and perhaps limit what we attempt? How do terms such as edition, project, database, archive, and thematic research collection relate to the past, present, and future of textual studies? Drawing on a range of resources including the Walt Whitman Archive, I consider how current terms describing digital scholarship both clarify and obscure our collective enterprise. In addition, I’ll use the final term, thematic research collection, to discuss yet-to-be-developed parts of the Whitman Archive dealing with place-based cultural analysis and translation studies as a way to illustrate the expansive possibilities of this new model of scholarship.

Professor at the University of Nebraska-Lincoln, Price received his B.A. from Whitman College in Walla Walla, Washington, and then earned both M.A. and Ph.D. degrees from the University of Chicago. He is University Professor and Hillegass Chair of Nineteenth-Century American literature at the University of Nebraska-Lincoln where he also serves as co-director of the Center for Digital Research in the Humanities. Price is the author of over forty articles and author or editor of nine books. His most recent book is co-edited with Ed Folsom and with Susan Belasco, Leaves of Grass: The Sesquicentennial Essays (University of Nebraska Press, 2007). His other recent books include Re-Scripting Walt Whitman: An Introduction to His Life and Work , co-authored with Folsom (Blackwell Publishing, 2005) and To Walt Whitman, America (University of North Carolina Press 2004), a main selection of The Readers Subscription, a national book club.

Since 1995 Price has served as co-director of The Walt Whitman Archive an electronic research and teaching tool that sets out to make Whitman’s vast work, for the first time, easily and conveniently accessible to scholars, students, and general readers. The Whitman Archive has been awarded federal grants from the National Endowment for the Humanities (NEH), the U. S. Department of Education, and the Institute for Museum and Library Services. The Whitman Archive has received many honors, including the C. F. W. Coker award from the Society of American Archivists and a “We the People” grant from the NEH to build a permanent endowment to support ongoing editorial work.

We will meet on Tuesday, March 11 fom 4:00-6:30 PM in the McKeldin Special Events Room (6th floor, room 6137), McKeldin Library, on the University of Maryland campus in College Park. There will be an informal dinner downstairs in MITH after the forum, at a cost of $10 per person. Please RSVP to Matt Kirschenbaum (mgk[at]umd[dot]edu) by March 7, 2008 if you would like to have dinner (money will be collected at the door–please have cash).

Co-sponsored by the Center for History & New Media (CHNM) at George Mason, the Center for New Designs in Learning & Scholarship (CNDLS) at Georgetown, and the Maryland Institute for Technology in the Humanities (MITH), the Rosenzweig Technology and Humanities Forum explores important issues in humanities computing and provide an opportunity for DC area scholars interested the uses of new technology in the humanities to meet and get acquainted.

McKeldin Library is located at the top of McKeldin Mall at the center of the University of Maryland, College Park campus. There is free shuttle service to campus from the College Park Metro station (Green line). Best parking for visitors is the lot next to Stamp Student Union, less than five minute walk to the Library.

Bob Stein on “The Evolution of Reading and Writing in the Networked Era”

This fall the Washington DC Area Forum on Technology and the Humanities is pleased to present:

Bob Stein on “The Evolution of Reading and Writing in the Networked Era”

For the past several hundred years intellectual discourse has been shaped by the rhythms and hierarchies inherent in the nature of print. As discourse shifts from page to screen, and more significantly to a networked environment, the old definitions and relations are undergoing substantial changes. The shift in our world view from individual to network holds the promise of a radical reconfiguration in culture. Notions of authority are being challenged. The roles of author and reader are morphing and blurring. Publishing, methods of distribution, peer review and copyright – every crucial aspect of the way we move ideas around – is up for grabs. The new digital technologies afford vastly different outcomes ranging from oppressive to liberating. How we make this shift has critical long term implications for human society.

Our speaker will be Robert Stein, director of the Institute for the Future of the Book. The institute has two principal activities. one is building high-end tools for making rich media electronic documents (part of the Mellon Foundation’s higher-ed digital infrastructure initiative) and the other is exploring and hopefully influencing the evolution of new forms of intellectual expression and discourse. Previously Stein was the founder of The Voyager Company where over a 13-year period he led the development of over 300 titles in The Criterion Collection, a series of definitive films on videodisc, and more than 75 CD ROM titles including the CD Companion to Beethoven’s Ninth Symphony, Who Built America, and the Voyager edition of Macbeth.

We will meet on Wednesday November 7, 2007 from 4:30-7:00 PM on George Mason University’s Fairfax campus in Room 163 of the Research 1 Building. There will be an informal dinner after the forum, at a cost of $10 per person. You must RSVP to Meredith Mayo (
mmayo1[at]gmu[dot]edu) by October 30, 2007 if you would like to have dinner.

Co-sponsored by the Center for History & New Media (CHNM) at George Mason, the Center for New Designs in Learning & Scholarship (CNDLS) at Georgetown, and the Maryland Institute for Technology in the Humanities (MITH), the DC Area Technology and Humanities Forum explores important issues in humanities computing and provide an opportunity for DC area scholars interested the uses of new technology in the humanities to meet and get acquainted.

The Research 1 building is located on the main Fairfax campus of George Mason University. Parking is located directly across from the building in the Sandy Creek Parking Deck.

Forum returns December 5th

Scholarship 2.0: What Web 2.0 means for Digital Humanists

Tuesday December 5th from 5-7pm, Research 1 Room 462, Center for History & New Media, George Mason University, Fairfax, Virginia

This fall’s Washington DC Area Forum on Technology and the Humanities focuses on the opportunities and challenges presented by Web 2.0 technologies for digital humanists. Speakers will include Bryan Alexander on “Web 2.0 and Digital Humanists,” Dan Cohen on “Zotero and the Next Generation of Scholarly Research,” and Eddie Maloney on “When is an ePortfolio not an ePortfolio? Georgetown University’s Digital Notebook project.”

Bryan Alexander researches and develops programs on the advanced uses of information technology in liberal arts colleges. His specialties include digital writing, weblogs, copyright and intellectual property, information literacy, wireless culture and teaching, project management, information design, and interdisciplinary collaboration. He contributes to a series of weblogs, including NITLE Tech News, MANE IT leaders, and Smartmobs, when not creating digital learning objects (like Gormenghast). He has taught English and information technology studies at the University of Michigan and Centenary College.

Dan Cohen is an Assistant Professor in the Department of History and Art History at George Mason University and the Director of Research Projects at the Center for History and New Media. His research is in European and American intellectual history, the history of science (particularly mathematics), and the intersection of history and computing. He is co-author with Roy Rosenzweig of Digital History: A Guide to Gathering, Preserving, and Presenting the Past on the Web (University of Pennsylvania Press, 2005), author of Equations from God: Pure Mathematics and Victorian Faith (Johns Hopkins University Press, 2007), and has published articles and book chapters on the history of mathematics and religion, the teaching of history, and the future of history in a digital age in journals such as the Journal of American History, the Chronicle of Higher Education, and Rethinking History. At the Center for History and New Media he has co-directed the September 11 Digital Archive and the Echo project, and has developed software tools for scholars, teachers, and students.

Eddie Maloney is the Managing Director of CNDLS, the Director of Research and Learning Technologies for CNDLS and the Office of Information Systems, and a Visiting Assistant Professor in the Department of English. He holds a Ph.D. from The Ohio State University and a Master’s Degree from Syracuse University, both in English Literature. In his various roles at the University, Eddie helps to define Georgetown’s technology strategy as it relates to teaching and scholarship. His first love, though, is teaching, which he has been doing at the university level for the past fourteen years. . As a faculty member in the Department of English, he teaches 20th-century literature and narrative theory courses. He has published on James Joyce and J. D. Salinger, as well as on issues related to narrative and literary theory, film studies, and hypertext fiction. He is currently working on a book-length project on the use of artificial paratexts in fictional narratives.

The Forum will meet on Tuesday December 5, 2006 from 5:00-7:00 PM on George Mason University’s Fairfax campus in the Center for History & New Media Lab (room 462) in the Research 1 Building, directly across from the Sandy Creek Parking Deck. There will be an informal dinner after the forum, at a cost of $10 per person. You must RSVP online for dinner by November 28.

Co-sponsored by the Center for History & New Media (CHNM) at GMU and the Center for New Designs in Learning & Scholarship (CNDLS) at Georgetown, the DC Area Technology and Humanities Forum explores important issues in humanities computing and provide an opportunity for DC area scholars interested the uses of new technology in the humanities to meet and get acquainted.