docstop
World History Matters Logo

Unpacking Evidence Heading Graphic
Go to Finding World History Go to Unpacking Evidence Go to Analyzing Documents Go to Teaching Sources Go to About

Keyword Search Graphic

Advanced Search GraphicAdvanced Search Go Button



Official Documents Title



You be the historian

Official Documents: How did the document affect the flow of events?
Developed with T. Mills Kelly, George Mason University

This interactive exercise is designed for students. In it, students read the Mandate for Palestine (1922), which gave the British government control over this territory until 1948 and was a source of contention about land rights in Palestine for years to come. After reading the Mandate, with accompanying background information, students are asked to determine which phrase in the Mandate became the most important in future disputes over Palestine. Finally, they compare their response to that of a historian.



Official Documents: In what historical and organizational context was the document produced?

This interactive exercise is designed for students. In it, students read the Vietnamese Declaration of Independence (1945) and can access additional contextual information by clicking on highlighted passages. Based on this reading, they are asked to consider the ways in which the Vietnamese Declaration of Independence reflects the events surrounding its creation, and how Ho Chi Minh strategically used those events to make an argument for the Democratic Republic of Vietnam, free from French colonial rule. Then, they are asked to determine how U.S. political officials responded to the Vietnamese Declaration of Independence.



Official Documents: Who was the primary audience for the document?
Benedict Carton, George Mason University

This interactive exercise is designed for students. In it, students are asked to read the “Decree of Leopold II, King of the Belgians, Sovereign of the Independent State of the Congo, Regarding Settlements for African Children,” issued on July 21, 1890. They are given the chance to answer three questions about King Leopold's motivations and intended audiences for the decree. Then they read the document again and listen to Professor of History Benedict Carton analyze it to compare their responses to his.



finding world history | unpacking evidence | analyzing documents | teaching sources | about

A project of the Center for History and New Media, George Mason University,
with support from the National Endowment for the Humanities and the Gladys Krieble Delmas Foundation
© 2003-2005 center for history & new media