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You be the historian!

Newspapers: What was left out of the story? How can I find out more?
Developed with Matt Karush, George Mason University

This interactive exercise is designed for students. Students read three newspapers published in Buenos Aires, Argentina, on March 24 or March 25, 1928 when the top news story was the formal announcement that Hipólito Yrigoyen would be the candidate of the Personalist Radical Party in the presidential election to be held on April 1. Students are asked to compare the front pages of these newspapers and determine the readership of each.



Newspapers: Who published this newspaper and why?
Developed with T. Mills Kelly, George Mason University

This interactive exercise is designed for students. Students read excerpts from three different newspaper stories about the visit of the American ex-President Theodore Roosevelt to Budapest on April 19, 1910—the Washington Post of Washington D.C., United States; Pesti Hirlap of Budapest, Hungary; and the Times of London, England. Students are asked to take notes on each story, paying careful attention to clues in the texts and the differences between the three presentations of the events of that day. They are then asked to determine which excerpt came from which newspaper.



Newspapers: Who read this newspaper and why?
Developed by Kristin Lehner and Benedict Carton, George Mason University

This interactive exercise is designed for students. Students examine the front pages of two newspapers from South Africa in the mid-1980s, Grassroots and Isizwe, which were both controlled by the United Democratic Front (UDF), a nonracial anti-apartheid movement, but were created to reach different target audiences. Based on a careful examination of the newspapers, students are asked to determine the focus, purpose, and audience of both through an interactive Flash exercise.



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