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The Center for History and New Media (CHNM) at George Mason University received funding from the National Endowment for the Humanities and the Gladys Krieble Delmas Foundation to create World History Sources.

 

World History teachers face many challenges to incorporating primary sources in their teaching—the pressures of coverage in survey courses, the lack of available materials, and inadequate training in dealing with unfamiliar sources from a range of cultures. World History Sources responds to these challenges (as well as the new opportunities offered by the Internet) by creating a website to help world history teachers and students locate, analyze, and learn from online primary sources and to further their understanding of the complex nature of world history, especially the issues of cultural contact and globalization.

 

World History Sources reflects three approaches central to current world history scholarship: an emphasis on comparative issues rather than civilizations in isolation; a focus on contacts among different societies and the economic, social, and cultural consequences of those contacts; and an attentiveness to “global” forces that transcend individual societies or even societies in mutual contact—forces such as technology diffusion, migration, disease transmission, extension and realignments of trade routes, or missionary outreach. World History Sources also benefits tremendously from recent advances in our understanding of how historical learning takes place, building on strategies designed to improve historical learning and history teaching.

 


Center for History & New Media
George Mason University
Fairfax, VA 22030
703-993-4585
whm@chnm.gmu.edu

 

Roy Rosenzweig (Executive Producer/Principal Investigator) is College of Arts and Sciences Distinguished Professor of History at GMU. As founder and director of CHNM, he has produced a number of new media projects including the website, History Matters: The U.S. Survey Course on the Web; the website and CD-ROM Liberty , Equality, Fraternity: Exploring the French Revolution; the CD-ROM sequel to the first Who Built America, and ECHO: Exploring and Collecting History Online.

 

T. Mills Kelly (Project Co-Director) is an Assistant Professor in the Department of History and Art History at George Mason University (GMU) and is Associate Director of the Center for History and New Media (CHNM). During the 1999-2000 academic year he was a Fellow with the Carnegie Foundation for the Advancement of Teaching and conducted research with this support that focused on how the use of new media learning resources changes student learning in introductory history courses.

 

Kelly Schrum (Project Co-Director) is Assistant Director of CHNM and an Assistant Research Professor at GMU. She has worked extensively in the areas of new media, history content development, and teacher training. She has authored several articles on history and new media, including “Making History on the Web Matter in Your Classroom,” in The History Teacher (May 2001) and “Navigating the Past,” in AHA Perspectives (May 2003).

 

Sharon Leon (Associate Director) is a Research Assistant Professor at CHNM. She received her bachelor's degree from Georgetown University and her doctorate in American Studies at the University of Minnesota. Her research interests include the study of race and gender in the history of religion and the history of science. Her work has appeared in Church History and the Journal of the History of Medicine and Allied Sciences.

 

Peter Stearns (Editor-in-Chief and Senior Scholar) is Professor of History and Provost at GMU. Founder and editor of the Journal of Social History, he is also a prolific author of dozens of books. His most recent publications include The Battleground of Desire: The Struggle for Self-Control in Modern America; Fat History: Bodies and Beauty in Western Society; Gender in World History; and World History: Patterns of Change and Continuity.

 

Paula Petrik (Information Architect and Web Designer) is a Professor in the Department of History and Art History at GMU and Associate Director of CHNM. She is the author or co-author of several books and co-author of a CD-ROM for Houghton Mifflin.

 

Amanda Shuman (Web Developer, Programmer, and Research Assistant) earned her BS in Information Technology at Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University. She is currently a graduate student in the Department of History and Art History at GMU.

 

Elena Razlogova (Programmer) is a graduate student at GMU. She is also the Web Master for CHNM.

 

Kristin Lehner (Research Assistant) earned her BA in History with a concentration in African Studies at Wesleyan University.

 

Jessica May (Research Assistant) graduated from George Mason University in 2002 with a B.A. in History. She is currently a graduate student in the Department of History and Art History at GMU and is working with the Technology Across the Curriculum program.

 

Stephanie Hurter (Research Assistant, Web Designer) earned her BA in History at West Chester University, Pennsylvania. She is currently a doctoral student in the Department of History and Art History at GMU.

 

Katharina Hering (Research Assistant) is a third-year Ph.D. student in the Department of History and Art History at GMU. She has worked at CHNM for two years.

 

Rustin Crandall (Research Assistant) earned his BA in History at the University of California, Los Angeles. He is currently a graduate student in the Department of History and Art History at GMU.

 

Pennee Bender is Associate Director of the Center for Media and Learning/American Social History Project at The Graduate Center, CUNY.

 

Josh Brown is Executive Director of the Center for Media and Learning/American Social History Project at The Graduate Center, CUNY.

 

David Pace is Associate Professor of History at Indiana University and Co-Director of the Faculty Development Program and the Lilly Freshman Seminar Program. He has published numerous articles on history teaching and is the co-author of Studying for History and the author of Claude Levi-Strauss: Bearer of Ashes. He is also the winner of the Indiana University teaching excellence award.

 

Sam Wineburg is Professor at Stanford University, College of Education. He is the author of Historical Thinking & Other Unnatural Acts: Charting the Future of Teaching the Past and numerous articles on history education. He has received many grants and prizes for research into how students learn history.

 

John Voll is Professor of History and Associate Director, Center for Muslim-Christian Understanding, Georgetown University. He is the author of Islam: Continuity and Change in the Modern World.

 

Bob Bain is Assistant Professor of Education at University of Michigan. Before joining the faculty at Michigan, Bain spent many years as a high school teacher of U.S. and world history.

 

Randy Bass is Executive Director of the Center for New Designs in Learning and Scholarship (CNDLS) at Georgetown University, the Director of the American Studies Crossroads Project, and the Director of the Visible Knowledge Project, a multi-year scholarship of teaching project focused on technology and learning.


Barbara Bindenbosch
is a Charlottesville, Virginia, teacher of world history.


Ross Dunn
is Professor of History at San Diego State University and Director of World History Projects at the National Center for History in the Schools.

 

Karen Hurt is an AP World History teacher at Stuart Hall School, Staunton, Virginia.

 

Pat Manning is Professor of History, African-American Studies, and Education at Northeastern University and the founder and director of its World History Center.

 

Heidi Roupp, former president of the World History Association, has taught world history at high school and college for more than 20 years and has authored numerous works on teaching world history.

Africa
Eric Allina-Pisano, Visiting Assistant Professor of History, Colgate University; dissertation “Negotiating colonialism: Africans, the state, and the market in Manica District, Mozambique, 1895-c.1935.”

 

Benedict Carton, Associate Professor of History, GMU; author of Blood from Your Children: The Colonial Origins of Generational Conflict in South Africa.

 

Robert Edgar, Professor of African Studies, Howard University; author of An African American in South Africa: The Travel Note of Ralph J. Bunche and co-author, African Apocalypse: The Story of Nontetha Nkwenkwe, a South African Prophet.

 

Anne Good, Assistant Professor of History, Reinhardt College; author several articles, including “The Construction of an Authoritative Text: Peter Kolb's Description of the Khoikhoi at the Cape of Good Hope in the Eighteenth Century”

 

East Asia
Michael Chang, Assistant Professor of History, GMU; dissertation “A Court on Horseback: Constructing Manchu Ethno-Dynastic Rule in China, 1751-1784.”

 

Brian Platt, Assistant Professor of History, GMU; author of Burning and Building: Schooling and State Formation in Japan, 1750-1890.

 

Pacific Basin
Kirsten McKenzie teaches history at the University of Sydney; author of Scandal in the Colonies: Sydney and Cape Town, 1800-1850.

 

Europe
(Ancient)
Jack Cheng, Independent Scholar; dissertation “Assyrian Music as Represented and Assyrian Representations of Music”.

 

Bert Lott, Assistant Professor of Classics, Vassar College; author of The Neighborhoods of Augustan Rome.

 

Randy H. Lytton, Professor of History, GMU; research interests include Alexander the Great, classical intellectual history, and classical historiography.

 

(Medieval)
Jonathan Rotondo-McCord, Associate Professor of History, Xavier University of Louisiana; author of articles dealing with medieval Germany; research interests explore the ties between politics and themes such as property, bodies and burial, and personal status.

 

Christopher K. Gardner, Western civilization post-doctoral fellow, GMU; dissertation “Negotiating Lordship: Efforts of the Consulat of Toulouse to Retain Autonomy under Capetian Rule”

 

Mack P. Holt, Professor of History, GMU; author of Branches of the Vine: Reformation and Culture in Early Modern Burgundy, 1477-1630 (forthcoming), The French Wars of Religion, 1562-1629, and The Duke of Anjou and the Politique Struggle During the Wars of Religion.

 

(Early Modern)
Mary Halavais, Assistant Professor of History, Sonoma State University; author of Like Wheat to the Miller: Community, Convivencia, and the Construction of Morisco Identity in Sixteenth-Century Aragon.

 

(Modern)
Wayne Hanley, Assistant Professor of History, West Chester University, Pennsylvania; dissertation “The Genesis of Napoleonic Propaganda, 1796-1799”.

 

Steven Harris, Assistant Professor of History, Mary Washington College

 

T. Mills Kelly, Assistant Professor of History, GMU, and Associate Director, Center for History and New Media; author of Without Remorse: Czech National Socialism and the Origins of Radical Nationalism in Central Europe (in progress).

 

Latin America
Joan Bristol, Assistant Professor, History, GMU; dissertation “Negotiating Authority in New Spain: Blacks, Mulattos, and Religious Practice in the Seventeenth Century.”

 

Matthew Karush, Associate Professor of History, GMU; director of the GMU Latin American Studies Program; publications include Workers or Citizens: Democracy and Identity in Rosario, Argentina, 1912-1930.

 

Christine Kray, Assistant Professor of Anthropology, Rochester Institute of Technology; dissertation “Worship in Body and Spirit: Practice, Self, and Religious Sensibility in Yucatan”.

 

Middle East and North Africa
Sumaiya Hamdani, Associate Professor of History, GMU; author of Between Revolution and State: Qadi al-Nu`man and the Construction of Fatimid Legitimacy (forthcoming).

 

Nancy Stockdale, Assistant Professor of History, University of Central Florida; publications include several articles on women and gender in the modern Middle East.

 

South Asia
Robert DeCaroli, Assistant Professor of Art History, GMU; dissertation on early Buddhist art of South and Southeast Asia.

 

Introductory Essay
Deborah Vess, Associate Professor of History and Director of Interdisciplinary Studies, Georgia College and State University. Her work as a Carnegie Scholar focuses on the teaching of world history.

 


Official Documents
David S. Trask, Professor of History, Guilford Technical Community College; teaches western and world civilization courses.

 

Benedict Carton (interactive exercise consultant), Associate Professor of History, GMU

 

Travel Narratives
Jerry Bentley, Professor of History, University of Hawaii; editor of the Journal of World History.

 

Material Culture—Images
Irene Bierman, Associate Professor of Architecture and Art of the Near East, University of California, Los Angeles.

 

Michael Chang (interactive exercise consultant), Assistant Professor of History, GMU

 

Brian Platt (interactive exercise consultant), Assistant Professor of History, GMU

 

Maps
Joni Seager, Dean of the Faculty of Environmental Studies, York University; author of thePenguin Atlas of Women in the World.

 

Music
Marion S. Jacobson, Assistant Professor of Music and Humanities, Albany College of Pharmacy of Union University.

 

Beth Bullard (interactive exercises consultant), Director of World Music Studies, George Mason University.

 

Personal Accounts

Beverly Mack, Associate Professor of African and African-American Studies, University of Kansas.

 

Steve Barnes (interactive exercise consultant), Assistant Professor of History, GMU

 

Material Culture—Objects

Daniel Waugh, Associate Professor of History and International Studies, University of Washington.

 

Robert DeCaroli (interactive exercise consultant), Assistant Professor of Art History, GMU

 

Newspapers
Anne Rubenstein, Professor of History, York University, Ontario.

 

Matthew Karush (interactive exercise consultant), Associate Professor of History, GMU

 

Analyzing Documents Authors
Material Culture—Images
Dana Leibsohn, Associate Professor of Art History, Smith College

 

Material Culture—Objects
Lawrence Butler, Associate Professor of Art History, George Mason University

 

Maps
Gerald A. Danzer, Professor of History Emeritus, University of Illinois, Chicago

 

Music
Michelle Kisliuk, Associate Professor of Music, University of Virginia

 

Newspapers
Jack Censer, Professor of History, George Mason University

 

Official Documents

Dina Khoury, Professor of History, George Washington University

 

Personal Accounts

Merry Wiesner-Hanks, Professor of History and Director of the Center for Women’s Studies, University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee

 

Travel Narratives
Tom Ewing, Assistant Professor of History, Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University

 

Teaching Sources Authors
Material Culture—Images
Sharon Cohen, Springbrook High School, Montgomery Country, Maryland

 

Material Culture—Objects
Jack Cheng, Independent Scholar, Boston, Massachusetts

 

Maps
Carol A. Keller, San Antoio College

 

Deborah Smith Johnston, Lexington High School, Lexington, Massachusetts

 

Music
Elizabeth F. Barkley, Foothill College

Elizabeth L. Wollman, Baruch College

 

Newspapers
Simon J. Potter, National University of Ireland, Galway

 

Jeff Brooks, Johns Hopkins University

 

Official Documents

Helen Grady, Springside School, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania

Edward Osowski, University of Northern Iowa

Nancy L. Stockdale, University of Central Florida

 

Personal Accounts

Kate Lang, University of Wisconsin-Eau Claire

Ane Lintvedt, McDonogh School, Owings Mills, Maryland

 

Travel Narratives
Peggy J. Martin, Del Rio High School, Del Rio, Texas

Patricia M.E. Lorcin, Texas Tech University

Tom Ewing, Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University

 

finding world history | unpacking evidence | analyzing documents | teaching sources | about

A project of the Center for History and New Media, George Mason University,
with support from the National Endowment for the Humanities and the Gladys Krieble Delmas Foundation
© 2003-2005 center for history & new media