Introduction

The Center for History and New Media (CHNM) at George Mason University received funding from the National Endowment for the Humanities to create Women in World History. The project is in development and will be completed by June 2006.

World history teachers face many challenges to incorporating primary sources in their teaching—pressures of coverage in survey courses, lack of available materials, and inadequate training in dealing with unfamiliar sources. These issues are especially challenging for teaching the history of women in the world. Women in World History responds by creating an online curriculum resource center to help high-school and college world history teachers and their students locate, analyze, and learn from primary sources dealing with women and gender in world history. These materials will encourage teachers to integrate the latest scholarship in women’s history and world history, as well as engaging primary sources, into their courses. Students will develop a more sophisticated framework for understanding the nature of historical inquiry.

Women in World History reflects three approaches central to current scholarship in world history and the history of women: an emphasis on comparative issues rather than civilizations in isolation; a focus on contacts among different societies; and an attentiveness to “global” forces, such as technology diffusion, migration, or trade routes, that transcend individual societies. Project materials also utilize recent advances in our understanding of how historical learning takes place, including complex interaction with sources, recursive reading, and skills used by historians.

Contact

Center for History & New Media
George Mason University
Fairfax, VA 22030
703-993-9277
wwh@chnm.gmu.edu

Project Team

Roy Rosenzweig (Executive Producer/Principal Investigator) is College of Arts and Sciences Distinguished Professor of History at George Mason University. As founder and director of CHNM, he has produced a number of new media projects including the website, History Matters: The U.S. Survey Course on the Web; the website and CD-ROM Liberty, Equality, Fraternity: Exploring the French Revolution; the CD-ROM sequel to the first Who Built America, and ECHO: Exploring and Collecting History Online.

T. Mills Kelly (Project Co-Director) is an Assistant Professor in the Department of History and Art History at George Mason University (GMU) and is Associate Director of the Center for History and New Media (CHNM). During the 1999-2000 academic year, he was a Fellow with the Carnegie Foundation for the Advancement of Teaching, and the research conducted with this support focused on how the use of new media learning resources changes student learning in introductory history courses.

Kelly Schrum (Project Co-Director) is Assistant Director of CHNM and an Assistant Research Professor at George Mason University. She has worked extensively in the areas of new media, history content development, and teacher training. She has authored several articles on history and new media, including “Making History on the Web Matter in Your Classroom,” in The History Teacher (May 2001) and “Surfing the Past Online,” in AHA Perspectives (May 2003).

Sharon Leon (Associate Director) is a Research Assistant Professor at CHNM. She received her bachelor’s degree from Georgetown University and her doctorate in American Studies at the University of Minnesota. Her research interests include the study of race and gender in the history of religion and the history of science. Her work has appeared in Church History and the Journal of the History of Medicine and Allied Sciences.

Peter Stearns (Editor-in-Chief and Senior Scholar) is Professor of History and Provost at George Mason University. Founder and editor of the Journal of Social History, he is also a prolific author of dozens of books. His most recent publications include The Battleground of Desire: The Struggle for Self-Control in Modern America;Fat History: Bodies and Beauty in Western Society; Gender in World History; and World History: Patterns of Change and Continuity.

Kristin Lehner (Project Manager) earned her BA in History with a concentration in African history at Wesleyan University. She has worked at CHNM for two years.

Rustin Crandall (Research Assistant) earned his BA in History at the University of California, Los Angeles. He received his MA in History and Art History at George Mason University and is currently a Peace Corps Volunteer in Georgetown, Guyana.

Katharina Hering (Research Assistant) is a third-year PhD student in the Department of History and Art History at George Mason University. She has worked at CHNM and at the GMU Special Collections Library.

Stephanie Hurter (Research Assistant, Web Designer) earned her BA in History at West Chester University, Pennsylvania. She is currently a doctoral student in the Department of History and Art History at George Mason University.

Rikk Mulligan (Web Developer) received his MA in History from George Mason University. He is currently a doctoral student at Michigan State University.

Paula Petrik (Information Architect and Web Designer) is a Professor in the Department of History and Art History at George Mason University and Associate Director of CHNM. She is the author or co-author of several books and coauthor of a CD-ROM for Houghton Mifflin.

Amanda Shuman (Web Developer, Programmer, Research Assistant) earned her BS in Information Technology at Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University. She is currently a graduate student in the Department of History and Art History at George Mason University.

Consultants

Marjorie Bingham (Senior Advisor) served as Co-director of the Women in World Area Studies Curriculum Project for ten years. A former junior high-school and high-school teacher and former adjunct faculty at Hamline University, Bingham has taught and written about women in world history for many years. Publications include Women and the Constitution (Jimmy Carter Center) and numerous articles on teaching history, world history, and women in world history.

Susan Gross (Senior Advisor) served as Executive Director of the Upper Midwest Women’s History Center for 20 years; Co-director of the Women in World Area Studies Curriculum Project; and Co-Director of the Women in Development Issues in Three World Areas project. Former high-school teacher and adjunct professor of history at Hamline University, Gross has taught and written about women in world history for many years.

Mary H. Rojas (Senior Advisor) was a faculty member at Virginia Tech for 13 years, where she taught sociology and international studies and was the Associate and Acting director for the Office for International Development. She also co-founded and directed the Program on Women in World Development. She left Virginia Tech to open her consulting firm, Rojas International Consultants.

Advisory Board

Patricia G. Avery taught social studies before receiving her Ph.D. in social studies education from Emory University in Atlanta, Georgia, in 1987. Her work frequently appears in social studies education journals and general education journals.

Bob Bain is Assistant Professor of History and Social Studies Education at University of Michigan. Before joining the faculty at Michigan, Bain spent more than 25 years as a high-school teacher of U.S. and world history. He has published widely on the pedagogy and practice of history and world history.

Anne Chapman has an MA in anthropology from the University of Cambridge, England, and a Ph.D. in history from Kent State University. Chapman taught AP European, world, and women’s history in high school for more than thirty years.

Sara Evans is Distinguished McKnight University Professor and Professor of History at the University of Minnesota. Publications include Tidal Wave: How Women Changed America at Century’s End; Born for Liberty: A History of American Women; and Personal Politics: The Roots of Women’s Liberation in the Civil rights Movement and the New Left.

Tom Hatch is co-director of the National Center for Restructuring Education, Schools and Teaching at Teachers College, Columbia University. He is a developmental psychologist with a doctorate from Harvard University, and has published widely on conceptions of intelligence and its multiple manifestations, alternative approaches to assessment, early-child development, and school reform.

Marilynn Jo Hitchens a former high-school teacher, is an Instructor at the University of Colorado at Denver where she teaches world history online and upper division graduate courses in the areas of Russian and European history. She is past president of the World History Association and director of the World History Institute for Teachers Online.

Gretchen Kreuter is an honorary fellow at the Institute for Research in the Humanities and the University of Wisconsin, Madison. She is coeditor and a contributor to Women of Minnesota: Selected Biographical Essays, and has conducted workshops on women’s history for classroom teachers at the Minnesota Historical Society and for the Minnesota Department of Education.

Meryll Page is currently a history teacher at St. Louis Park High School. She teaches Advanced Placement U.S. History and two International Baccalaureate history courses.

Heidi Roupp currently teaches and consults on World History projects. For 20 years, she taught World History, Asian Studies, Humanities, Comparative Political Systems, Geography, American History, and Western Civilization at Aspen High School in Aspen, Colorado. Former President of the World History Association and first recipient of the American Historical Association Beveridge Teaching Prize. She is Co-Director of the World History Network website, in collaboration with Pat Manning.

Peter Stearns (see above).

Margaret Strobel is Interim Director, Jane Addams Hull-House Museum, and Professor of Gender and Women’s Studies and History, University of Illinois at Chicago. She has published extensively in the area of African women’s history, including her book Muslim Women in Mombasa, 1890-1975. She is series coeditor of Restoring Women to History, with volumes on Africa, Asia, Latin America and the Caribbean, and the Middle East and North Africa.


Web Review Authors

Nora E. Jaffary is Assistant Professor of History at Concordia University in Montreal. She is author of False Mystics: Deviant Orthodoxy in Colonial Mexico

Kirsten McKenzie teaches history at the University of Sydney. Her most recent publication is Scandal in the Colonies: Sydney and Cape Town, 1800-1850

Primary Sources Guide Author

Nancy Wingfield is Associate Professor of History at Northern Illinois University. Recent publications include Creating the Other: The Causes and Dynamics of Nationalism, Ethnic Enmity, and Racism in Habsburg Central Europe; Staging the Past: The Politics of Commemoration in Habsburg Central Europe, 1848 to the Present; and Return to Diversity: A Political History of East Central Europe Since World War II.

Curriculum Modules Authors

Bhakti Poets
Doris Jakobsh, Assistant Professor, Department of Religious Studies, University of Waterloo, Canada; author of Relocating Gender in Sikh History: Transformation, Meaning and Identity

British Empire
Alison Fletcher, Assistant Professor of History, Kent State University

Cultural Contact in Southern Africa
Anne Good, Graduate student of History, University of Minnesota; author several articles, including “The Construction of an Authoritative Text: Peter Kolb's Description of the Khoikhoi at the Cape of Good Hope in the Eighteenth Century”

Dona Marina, Cortes’s Translator
Dana Leibsohn, Associate Professor of Art History and Director of the Latin American and Latino/a Studies program, Smith College

Early Modern Period
Maritere Lopez, Assistant Professor of History, California State University, Fresno

Charles Lipp, Western civilization postdoctoral fellow, Department of History and Art History, George Mason University; author of “Power and Politics in Early Modern Lorraine: Jean François de Mahuet and the Grand Prévôté de Saint-Dié”

Health in Latin America
Jadwiga Mooney, Assistant Professor of History, University of Arizona; dissertation “From Contested Duties to Disputed Rights: The Social Politics of Fertility Regulation in Chile, 1964-1989”

Imperialism in North Africa
Julia Clancy-Smith, Professor of History of the Middle East and North Africa, University of Arizona; author of Rebel and Saint: Muslim Notables, Populist Protest, Colonial Encounters (Algeria and Tunisia, 1800-1904)

Islamic Empire
Nancy Stockdale, Assistant Professor of Middle Eastern History, University of Central Florida; dissertation “Gender and Colonialism in Palestine 1800-1948: Encounters Among English, Arab and Jewish Women”

Puerto Rican Labor Movement
Milagros Denis, History Instructor, George Mason University; dissertation “One Drop of Blood: Racial Formation and Meanings in Puerto Rican Society, 1898-1960”

Sati
Barbara Ramusack, Professor of South Asian and Chinese History, University of Cincinnati; author of The Indian Princes and their States; coauthor of Women in Asia: Restoring Women to History

Southeast Asian Politics
Mina Roces, Senior Lecturer, University of New South Wales, School of History, Sydney, Australia; author of Women, Power and Kinship Politics: Female Power in Post-War Philippines

Soviet Dictatorship
Tom Ewing, Professor of History, Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University; author of Revolution and Pedagogy: Interdisciplinary and Transnational Perspectives on Educational Foundations

Western Views of Chinese Women
Cecily McCaffrey, Assistant Professor of History, Willamette University

Writers of the Heian Era
Esperanza Ramirez-Christensen, Professor of Japanese Literature, University of Michigan; coeditor of The Father-Daughter Plot: Japanese Literary Women and the Law of the Father

Lesson Plan Authors

J. Nathan Campbell teaches history at the Episcopal School of Dallas in Texas, and holds advanced degress in both American history and decorative arts.

Sharon C. Cohen teaches AP World History Springbrook High School in Maryland, and has published curriculum units for the College Board and the online model world history project World History For Us All.

Janelle Collett is a history teacher and faculty technology leader at Springside School in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania.

Ryba Epstein teaches AP World History at Rich East High School in Park Forest, Illinois, and holds a Ph.D. from the University of Illinois in Urbana-Champaign.

Angela Lee teaches world history at Weston High School in Massachusetts, and has been an AP World reader for the College Board for three years.

Harriett Lillich taught for 36 years in Mobile, Alabama, and has extensive experience developing the AP World History examination.

Frances Patchett is a Mentor Resource Teacher in the Fairfax County Public Schools in Virginia, and holds advanced degrees in both secondary education and U.S. history.

Rachel Pooley earned her M.A. in Latin American Studies at the University of Texas at Austin, and has experience teaching in a bilingual elementary school.

Catherine Snyder teaches global history in the Niskayuna Central School District in New York, and is pursuing her Ph.D. in Curriculum and Instruction at SUNY Albany.

Elizabeth Ten Dyke teaches global history at Kingston High School in New York, and is the author of Dresden: Paradoxes of Memory in History.

Bill Velto teaches world history at Cary Academy in North Carolina, and is a Teaching Fellow for the Choices Education Program at the Watson Institute for International Studies.

Analyzing Evidence Authors

Census Data
T. Mills Kelly, Assistant Professor of History, George Mason University; author of Without Remorse: Czech National Socialism and the Origins of Radical Nationalism in East Central Europe

Commission Records
Meredith McKittrick, Associate Professor of History, Georgetown University; author of To Dwell Secure: Generation, Christianity and Colonialism in Ovamboland, Northern Namibia

Inquisition Documents
Joan Bristol, Assistant Professor of History, George Mason University; dissertation “Negotiating Authority in New Spain: Blacks, Mulattos, and Religious Practice in the Seventeenth Century”

Literary Sources
Maureen Miller, Associate Professor of History, University of California, Berkeley; publications include The Bishop’s Place: Architecture and Authority in Medieval Italy

Manifest Records
Wendi Manuel-Scott, Assistant Professor of History, George Mason University; dissertation “Soldiers of the Field: Jamaican Farm Workers in the United States During World War II”

Oral History
Ellen Fleischmann, Associate Professor of History, University of Dayton; author of The Nation and its “New” Women: The Palestinian Women’s Movement, 1920-1948

Paintings and Prints
Brian Platt, Assistant Professor of History, George Mason University; author of Burning and Building: Schooling and State Formation in Japan, 1750-1890

Religious Texts
Sumiaya Hamdani, Associate Professor of History, George Mason University; author of Between Revolution and State: Qadi al-Nu’man and the Construction of Fatimid Legitimacy (forthcoming)

Teaching Case Studies Authors

Judy Gaughan, History Department, Colorado State University; dissertation “Murder is Not a Crime: An Investigation into the Nature of Roman Public Law”

Nora E. Jaffary, Assistant Professor of History , Concordia University; author of False Mystics: Deviant Orthodoxy in Colonial Mexico

T. Mills Kelly, Assistant Professor of History and Art History at George Mason University, George Mason University; author of Without Remorse: Czech Radical Nationalism in Late Imperial Austria (forthcoming)

Beverly Mack, Associate Professor of African and African American Studies, University of Kansas; author of One Woman’s Jihad: Nana Asma’u, Scholar and Scribe

Eric Martone, world history teacher, John F. Kennedy High School, Waterbury, Connecticut.

Jeremy D. Popkin, Professor of History and Department Chair, University of Kentucky; author of A History of Modern France

Susan Rimby, Professor of History and Philosophy, Shippensburg University; author of Nurses’ Questions/Women’s Questions: The Impact of the Demographic Revolution and Feminism on U.S. Working Women, 1946-1986

Mina Roces, Senior Lecturer, University of New South Wales, School of History, Sydney, Australia; author of Women, Power and Kinship Politics: Female Power in Post-War Philippines

Ulrike Strasser, Associate Professor of History, University of California/Irvine; author of State of Virginity: Politics, Religion, and Gender in a German Catholic Polity

Heidi Tinsman, Associate Professor of History, University of California/Irvine; author of Partners in Conflict: The Politics of Gender, Sexuality, and Labor in the Chilean Agrarian Reform, 1950-1973

Forum Moderators

Jean Allman is Professor of History at the University of Illinois, with appointments in Women’s Studies and African Studies. Recent publications include “I Will Not Eat Stone”: A Women’s History of Colonial Asante; The Quills of the Porcupine: Asante Nationalism in an Emergent Ghana, 1954-1957; and several edited collections.

Marjorie Bingham (see above)

Sharon C. Cohen teaches AP World History and IB Theory of Knowledge at Springbrook High School in Montgomery County, Maryland. She regularly presents papers on world history pedagogy at the annual conferences of the World History Association and other professional associations, served on the College Board's AP World History Development Committee, contributed articles to the online journal World History Connected, and published curriculum units for the College Board and the online model world history project World History For Us All.

Donna Guy is Professor of History at Ohio State University. She is the prize-winning author of Sex and Danger in Buenos Aires: Prostitution, Family, and Nation in Argentina; Sex and Sexuality in Latin America; White Slavery and Mothers Alive and Dead: The Troubled Meeting of Sex, Gender, Public Health and Progress in Latin America; and From Private Acts to Public Identities: Teaching the History of Sexuality Since the Eighteenth Century. Professor Guy has received a number of grants, fellowships, and awards, and served on many editorial boards.

Dorothy Ko is Professor of History at Barnard College. Her research as a cultural historian of early modern China and East Asia bridges the disciplines of history and women’s studies. Publications include Teachers of the Inner Chambers: Women and Culture in Seventeenth-Century China, Every Step a Lotus: Shoes for Bound Feet, and Footbinding is History (forthcoming).

Heidi Roupp (see above).

Kurt Waters is chair of the social studies department at Centerville High School in Fairfax County, Virginia. He is sponsor of the international club at Centerville and is involved in the “Linking Leadership to Instruction” program with the Virginia Department of Education

Merry Wiesner-Hanks is Professor of History at University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee, coeditor of the Sixteenth Century Journal, Coordinator of the Comparative Study of Religion Program, and Interim Director of the Center for Women’s Studies. Publications include the prize-winning book, Women and Gender in Early Modern Europe: New Approaches to Modern European History; Gender in History; Lives and Voices: A Sourcebook on European Women; and Christianity and Sexuality in the Early Modern World: Regulating Desire, Reforming Practice.