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The Coming of the Europeans

American History, Volume I: Aboriginal America (New York: Sheldon, 1860)


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282 THE COMING OF THE EUROPEANS.

ble trade has sprung up, it is true, between the natives and the-whites, by which, in exchange for skins and furs which they obtain by trapping and the chase, the former procure a great many com- modities that are produced by the arts and manu- factures of civilized life. But the introduction of these commodities among them does not have the effect of changing their habits or modes of life in any appreciable degree, but rather, by facilitating the supply of their wants and the, satisfaction of their desires, to fix and establish these habits more firmly than ever. They obtain from white men horses and guns and blankets, and gaudy trappings and decorations of all kinds. But they use all these things only as means to enable them the better to act their parts as huntsmen and warriors.

THE MANDAN LODGES.

Some of the western tribes avail themselves of their commerce with the whites to procure the means of adding very materially to their domestic comfort, while still not essentially changing the system of life handed down to them from their forefathers. They built lodges of great size, some- times fifty feet in diameter. The sides are formed, for four or five feet above the ground, of a bank of earth. Above this the walls are continued upward



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