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The Coming of the Europeans

American History, Volume I: Aboriginal America (New York: Sheldon, 1860)


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THE COMING OF THE EUROPEANS. 285

with which he entertained the idea of living with them and becoming one among them.

THE KENNEBEC INDIAN AND HIS CHILD.

Nothing can illustrate in a more touching man- ner the influence of this feeling than the story of the Kennebec Indian and his dead child. The tribe to which this poor man belonged lived on the banks of the Kennebec, in Maine, and when the State passed into the occupancy of white men, it became nearly or quite extinct. One man of the tribe who still remained, so recommended himself by his good behavior, and by his evident desire to adopt the habits of civilized life, that he received a grant of land from the State, in a certain town- ship, and he settled upon this land with his wife and child, while the other farms in the neighbor- hood were settled by whites.

The Indian was treated fairly enough by his neighbors in their ordinary dealings with him, but still he was an Indian in their view, and they felt no cordial sympathy with him or his family. They did not admit him to any intimate relations with them, or regard him with the kind and friendly feelings which they entertained for each other.

At length his child fell sick and died. The



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