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The Coming of the Europeans

American History, Volume I: Aboriginal America (New York: Sheldon, 1860)


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286 THE COMING OP THE EUROPEANS.

neighbors did not come to see the family in their distress, and the poor Indian buried his child alone.

Not long afterward he went to some of his neighbors, and said to them in his broken language as follows :

"When white man's child die, Indian man be sorry. He help bury him. When my child die, no one speak to me. I make his grave alone. I can't no live here any longer."

He gave up his farm, dug up the body of his child, and carried it away with him, two hundred miles through the woods, to Canada, and joined a tribe of Indians living there, to share with them, for the rest of his clays, the hardships and priva- tions of barbarism.

THE FEELING OF REPULSION THAT EXISTS BETWEEN THE DIF- FERENT RACES OF MAN NOT NECESSARILY A PREJUDICE

That peculiar feeling of repulsion which seen universally in operation between the different races of men, and makes them mutually disinclined to live together in intimate domestic and social rela- tions, is not, as is sometimes supposed, necessarily a prejudice It results, as has already been inti- mated, from a wise and beneficent law of nature--- one in universal operation throughout the whole



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