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The Coming of the Europeans

American History, Volume I: Aboriginal America (New York: Sheldon, 1860)


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274 THE COMING OF THE EUROPEANS.

able, unaided by man, to occupy the northern re- gions on the Atlantic; for although these regions were well adapted to produce their peculiar food, the winters were too long and cold for such ani- mals to live through them without artificial aid. With this aid, however, they can do it, and thus, under the fostering charge of man, the green mea- dows and hill-sides, extending over many thou- sands of square miles between the lakes and the sea, have been covered with flocks' of sheep and herds of horses and cows, while the bear and the moose that formerly had possession of them have passed away. A few lingering specimens only remain to roam in solitude within the narrow limits left to them, and to wonder where their companions can have gone.

CHANGES IN RESPECT TO PLANTS.

Changes corresponding to these have taken place on a vast scale in the vegetable kingdom. Multi- tudes of plants that were introduced into Am erica by the European colonists, either accidentally or by design, have since that time become very widely extended here, and have extirpated or dis- placed, to a corresponding degree, the original occupants of the soil. These changes have taken place sometimes with and sometimes without the



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