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The Coming of the Europeans

American History, Volume I: Aboriginal America (New York: Sheldon, 1860)


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THE COMING OF THE EUROPEANS. 275

aid of man. One of the most striking examples of the former class is that. of the grasses and the cereal grains, such as wheat and rye, which now cover millions and millions of acres through all the central regions of the continent, where formerly brakes and bullrushes and wild wood-flowers, bar- en and useless, had complete possession.

It is well that this should be so. Such changes are in fulfillment of the beneficent designs formed by the author of nature for the gradual improve- ment of the condition of the earth, and the ad- vancement of it, in respect to its occupants, from lower to higher and nobler forms of life.

CHANGES IN THE RACES OF MEN.

A change exactly analogous to these has taken place in respect to man. The aboriginal inhabit- ants of the country were of races formed with con- stitutions, both physical and mental, adapting them to obtain their livelihood by fishing and the chase— modes of life by means of which North America might sustain perhaps twenty or thirty millions of inhabitants. The Caucasian race, which was in- troduced from Europe, is endowed with consti- tutions adapting them to gain their livelihood by agriculture, commerce, and the manufacturing arts, a mode of life by which the same territory



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