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The Coming of the Europeans

American History, Volume I: Aboriginal America (New York: Sheldon, 1860)


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THE CORING OF THE EUROPEANS. 277

the various aboriginal races had always been, still continued to be, treated with the strictest justice and the most sincere and cordial good will, they would have none the less surely fulfilled the universal destiny of the lower to give way before the higher forms, in the great onward march of organization and life ; but the change would have come slowly, quietly, and without suffering. In- deed, the very beings subject to it, with the excep- tion of a few far-seeing minds that might discover it by a special and laborious study of the past and of the future, would have been unconscious that it was going on.

DIFFICULTIES THAT OPPOSED THE AMALGAMATION OF THE TWO RACES.

It might at first be supposed that when a supe- rior and an inferior race were brought thus together upon the same territory, a process of amalgama- in would have set in, by which, in the end, they ould gradually be melted into one ; but there very deep-seated causes operating in all such to prevent such a union. In the first place, e mental and physical constitution of the Indian him specially for wandering as a hunter rough the woods, and gaining his subsistence the chase, and for no other mode of life.



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