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A Text Book of the Origin and History of the Colored People

Hartford: L. Skinner, 1841


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77

and so, and so forth, when them fruit is the fruit of ill will.

II. Its tendency. 1st. Insubordination, bloodshed, and murder, are its legitimate aim. It needs only to be resisted in a rightful degree even, and it can soon show that neither law nor human blood are sacred in its way. If any man disputes this, I appeal to the annals of the bloody riots of days gone by not far. What kind of a spirit was that which beseiged our houses with brickbats, stones, and deadly weapons, broke up the Canterbury school, put a rope around Garrison's neck, burnt Pennsylvania Hall, and shot Lovejoy? Was there no insubordination, no bloodshed nor murder in all this? And what if that spirit should have been moderately resisted in all this? Why no one can even guess at the extent to which it tended.

2d. It tends to blindness of mind. Who can be blinder than he who abuses all relation and obligation, and argues that he is doing no wrong? And let any man say



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