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There are 338 matching records. Displaying matches 1 through 30.

Unpacking Evidence Icon Graphic

Unpacking Travel Narratives
Jerry Bentley

This guide introduces travel narratives in world history and ways historians use them, questions to ask when reading travel narratives, a sample analysis of a travel narrative, an annotated bibliography, and a guide to finding travel narratives online. The guide is written by Jerry Bentley, Professor of History at University of Hawaii and the editor of the Journal of World History. He has written numerous books and articles including Old World Encounters: Cross-Cultural Contacts and Exchanges in Pre-Modern Times, (as co-author) Traditions and Encounters: A Global Perspective on the Past, and Shapes of World History in Twentieth-Century Scholarship.

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Unpacking Material Culture--Objects
Daniel Waugh

This guide introduces objects as a source of material culture in world history and the ways historians use them to understand history, questions to ask when using objects as a source, two sample analyses of using objects, an annotated bibliography, and a guide to finding material culture—objects online. This guide is written by Daniel Waugh, Professor of History at University of Washington. Much of his research deals with Medieval and Early Modern Russia, although his teaching of late increasingly focuses on Central Asia. He is project director for Silk Road Seattle and has a strong interest in the creation of digital resources for learners of all ages.

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Unpacking Maps
Joni Seager

This guide introduces maps in world history and ways historians use them, questions to ask when using maps, a sample analysis of interpreting a map, an annotated bibliography, and a guide to finding map resources online. The guide is written by Joni Seager is Professor of Geography at University of Vermont. She is also the author of an environmental atlas, The State of the Earth, and three editions of an atlas on the international status of women: The Penguin Atlas of Women in the World (2003). She is also the author of several non-atlas works, including most recently Putting Women in Place: Feminist Geographers Make Sense of the World (Guilford, 2001).

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Unpacking Official Documents
David Trask

This guide introduces official documents in world history and ways historians use them, questions to ask when using official documents, a sample analysis of interpreting an official document, an annotated bibliography, and a guide to finding official document resources online. This guide is written by David Trask, Professor of History at Guilford Technical Community College in Jamestown, North Carolina. Trask teaches world civilization and western civilization. He was co-editor of a special issue of The History Teacher (November 1999) on teaching history at two-year colleges and served as contributing editor for the Teaching column of Perspectives, the Newsletter of the American Historical Association.

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Unpacking Personal Accounts
Beverly Mack

This guide introduces personal accounts in world history and ways historians use them, questions to ask when using personal accounts, two sample analyses of interpreting personal accounts , an annotated bibliography, and a guide to finding personal account resources online. This guide was written by Beverly Mack, Associate Professor of African and African-American Studies at the University of Kansas. Much of her research focuses on the relationship between women and power in Africa, and her book, Muslim Women Sing: Hausa Women’s Scholarship and Song in Contemporary Northern Nigeria, is forthcoming from Indiana University Press.

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Unpacking Newspapers
Anne Rubenstein

This guide discusses the role of newspapers in world history and the ways in which historians use them as a historical source. It presents a list of questions to ask of newspapers when using them as a source, and a sample analysis of Mexico City's El Universal newspaper based on these questions. It also includes an annotated bibligraphy and guide to finding historical newspapers online. The guide is written by Anne Rubenstein, Associate Professor of History at York University in Ontario, Canada. She has published widely on Mexican comics and is author of Bad Language, Naked Ladies, and Other Threats to the Nation: a Political History of Comic Books in Mexico.

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Unpacking Music
Marion Jacobson

This guide discusses the role of music in world history and the ways in which historians use it as a historical source. It presents a list of questions to ask about music when using it as a source, and a sample analysis of steel bands in Brooklyn, New York, based on these questions. It also includes an annotated bibligraphy and guide to finding historical music online. The guide is written by Marion Jacobson, Assistant Professor of Music and Humanities at Albany College of Pharmacy of Union University. Her interests include world musics in Diasporas, issues of ethnicity and identity in Judaism and American culture, klezmer music, and Yiddish song, and she has published essays in Jewish Folklore and Ethnography and in two edited volumes: American Klezmer: Roots and Offshoots (University of California Press, 2002) and Chorus and Community (University of Illinois Press, 2003).

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Unpacking Material Culture--Images
Irene Bierman

This guide introduces images as a source for understanding world history, and focuses on five specific questions to ask when analyzing images. It includes a sample analysis of analyzing an image, an annotated bibliography, and a guide to finding material culture—images online. This guide is written by Irene Bierman, Professor of Art History at the University of California, Los Angeles, where she teaches primarily Middle Eastern history and art history. She has published widely on Islamic art.

Analyzing Documents Icon Graphic

Analyzing Paintings and Prints
Brian Platt

In this interview, Brian Platt (Assistant Professor of History at George Mason University) analyzes Japanese woodblock prints from the 17th and 18th centuries, providing a model for how to examine historical images. These popular woodblock prints, known as ukiyo-e, represent images of women as seen through the eyes of male artists, printers, and publishers. Platt focuses on a group of prints entitled "A Parent's Moralizing Spectacles" by Utamaro. In doing so, he shows how creators and consumers of this genre of art were Japanese urban commoners who, through this shared visual imagery, contributed to emerging notions of gender and national identity.

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Analyzing Literary Sources
Maureen Miller

In this interview, Maureen Miller (Associate Professor of History at the University of California, Berkeley) analyzes Marie de France's 14th century lais. Lais are short poetic stories usually about courtship and romance, written during the Middle Ages in Western Europe and shared orally among nobility. Miller focuses on Marie de France, a literate member of the nobility and one of the few women who claimed authorship for her stories. In doing so, Miller examines the opportunites Medieval women had and the roles they played in society and sheds light on historians' competing interpretations of these lais.

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Analyzing Manifest Records
Wendi Manuel-Scott

In this interview, Wendi Manuel-Scott (Assistant Professor of History and African American Studies at George Mason University) analyzes manifest records from several ships that sailed from the islands in the Caribbean to New York City in the early 20th century. Manuel-Scott walks through the types of information that can be gleaned from these records—from name and nationality to occupation to who paid for the voyage to the name of a future employer in the U.S.—and discusses other types of sources that can be used to create a fuller picture of the experience of Caribbean migrants.

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Analyzing Oral History
Ellen Fleischmann

In this interview, Ellen Fleischmann (Associate Professor of History at the University of Dayton) discusses oral histories of Palestinian women she conducted in the mid-1990s. In them, she focues on Palestinian women's experiences between about 1920 and 1948 when Palestine was goverened by the British Mandate established after World War I. In examining the social and political lives of Palestinian women, both Christians and Muslims, during this time period, Fleischmann destructs common stereotypes about Middle Eastern women. She also discusses the process of collecting oral histories and the challenges of using it as a historical source.

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Analyzing Religious Texts
Sumaiya Hamdani

In this interview, Sumaiya Hamdani (Assistant Professor of History at George Mason University) discusses Hadith, reports about what the Prophet Muhammad said or thought that provide Muslims with a sense of how Muhammad applied the guidelines of the Koran to daily life. Specifically, Hamdani focuses on Hadith written by A'isha, one of the Prophet Muhammad's wives. In doing so, she shows that the Hadith reflect the accepted authority of women during the Prophet Muhammad's time, and examines the variety of roles that these Hadith suggest that women played in early Islam.

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Analyzing Inquisition Documents
Joan Bristol

In this interview, Joan Bristol (Assistant Professor of History at George Mason University) examines a case from the Mexican Inquisition, a tribunal created in Spain in the late 15th century to prosecute people who committed crimes against Christianity. In this case, a nun, Juana de la Cruz, accused her 14-year-old servant, Gertrudis de Escobar, of renouncing God three times. Gertrudis de Escobar was a mulata—the child of a white person and a black person. Bristol uses this case to examine women's roles and the social position of blacks and mulattos in New Spain in the 16th and 17th centures.

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Analyzing Material Culture - Objects
Lawrence Butler

In this interview, Lawrence Butler discusses strategies for analyzing and interpreting the structure of historical buildings, specifically the Hagia Sophia in Istanbul, Turkey. The Hagia Sophia was built in the early 6th century by the Emperor Justinian and offers an opportunity to investigate evolving religious practices, architectural and engineering techniques, and the relationship between a building and political power. Lawrence Butler is a Professor of Art History at George Mason University. He has published on the Hagia Sophia and related 6th-century structures, on the history of American scholarship in the eastern Mediterranean, and on the mosques of East Asia, Chinese art, and material culture of the Silk Road.

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Analyzing Material Culture - Images
Dana Leibsohn

In this interview, Dana Leibsohn discusses strategies for interpreting works of art, specifically two paintings from 16th-century Spanish America. The first is the cover of the Codex Mendoza, a map representing the founding of Tenochtitlan (1543). The second is a painting entitled “The Mulatto Gentlemen of Esmeraldas” (1599). These images offer an important window into visual culture and social, religious, and political life in the early era of Spanish colonization. Dana Leibsohn is Associate Professor of Art History at Smith College. She publishes on the visual culture of colonial Latin America, focusing on indigenous maps, histories, and modes of writing.

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Analyzing Personal Accounts
Merry Wiesner-Hanks

In this interview, Merry Wiesner-Hanks discusses strategies for analyzing and interpreting personal accounts using two accounts from women of different backgrounds. The first is a diary written by a Jewish merchant, Glikl of Hameln. The second is a memoir written by a Protestant midwife, Catharina Schrader. These writings offer an important window into the daily lives and life cycles of non-elite women living in early modern Europe. Merry Wiesner-Hanks is Professor of History, the Director of the Center for Women’s Studies, and the Coordinator of the Comparative Study of Religion Program at the University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee. She is the co-editor of the Sixteenth Century Journal and the author of over 50 articles and 10 books, including Working Women in Renaissance Germany, Women and Gender in Early Modern Europe, Christianity and Sexuality in the Early Modern World: Regulating Desire, Reforming Practice, and Gender in History .

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Analyzing Maps
Gerald Danzer

In this interview, Gerald Danzer discusses strategies for analyzing and interpreting maps. Using variations of a Mercator projection, as well as several old maps, Danzer suggests some of the ways the choices made by mapmakers have a significant impact on our understanding of the world. Gerald Danzer is Professor of History, Emeritus at the University of Illinois at Chicago. For three decades he directed an M.A. program for teachers of history. Author or editor of over a dozen books, textbooks, and atlases, his special interest is the use of old maps as historical documents.

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Analyzing Newspapers
Jack Censer

In this interview, Jack Censer discusses strategies for analyzing and interpreting newspapers. Censer uses 18th-century French and 21st-century U.S. newspapers to show how they can offer an important window into the past. Jack Censer is Professor of History at George Mason University in Fairfax, Virginia. Most recently, he published, with Lynn Hunt, a general study of the French Revolution entilted Liberty, Equality, Fraternity: Exploring the French Revolution, that includes a book, CD-rom, and website. He is also the author of The French Press in the Age of Enlightenment and Prelude to Power: The Parisian Radical Press, 1789-91 and has edited two books: Press and Politics in Pre-Revolutionary France and French Revolution and Intellectual History.

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Analyzing Official Documents
Dina Khoury

In this interview, Dina Khoury discusses strategies for analyzing and interpreting official documents using two official Ottoman Empire proclamations from the 19th-century. Both texts are part of the Ottoman government’s response to internal and external demands for reform stemming from the growing weakness of the state. Dina Khoury is Professor of History at George Washington University in Washington, D.C. Her principal publications include State and Provincial Society in the Ottoman Empire (1997), “Political Relations between State and Urban Society, 1770-1850” in Peter Sluglett, editor, The Social History of Cities in the Middle East (1998), and, “Slippers at the Entrance or Behind Closed Doors: Domestic and Public Space for Mosuli Women” in Madeline Zilfi, editor, Women in the Early Modern Ottoman Empire (1996).

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Analyzing Commission Records
Meredith McKittrick

In this interview, Meredith McKittrick (Associate Professor of History at Georgetown University) discusses a commission hearing conducted in southeastern Nigeria in 1930 by British colonial officials. The hearing investigated a series of disturbances by local women following a rumor that the British were going to tax women. The commission hearing records are one of the few places in the colonial record where West African women’s voices can be heard. Through a careful examination of the commission records, McKittrick shows both what it means to be a woman in this rapidly changing society, and the misunderstandings inherent in cultural contact.

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Analyzing Census Data
T. Mills Kelly

In this interview, T. Mills Kelly (Assistant Professor in the Department of History and Art History at George Mason University) discusses census data collected during the late Hapsburg Monarchy. This data was collected for most towns and cities throughout the Monarchy and covers occupation, disease, language, and literacy for men and women separately. Kelly shows how census data can be useful for uncovering women's daily lives during the monarchy, especially in the absence of other sources that document women's activities.

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Analyzing Travel Narratives
Tom Ewing

In this interview, Tom Ewing discusses strategies for analyzing and interpreting travel narratives. Ewing uses John Ledyard's 18th century journal of Captain Cook's Third Voyage to show how travel narratives can offer an important window into the past. Tom Ewing is an assistant professor in the Department of History at Virginia Tech. His publications include The Teachers of Stalinism. Policy, Practice, and Power in Soviet Schools in the 1930s (New York: Peter Lang Publishing, 2002) and articles in Russian Review, Gender & History, and the History of Education Quarterly. He is currently editing the essay collection, Revolution and Pedagogy. Transnational Perspectives on the Social Foundations of Education, and co-editing the collection, Education and the Great Depression. Lessons from a World History. He is project director of the Digital History Reader, an Exemplary Education project funded by the National Endowment for the Humanities.

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Analyzing Music
Michelle Kisliuk

In this interview, Michelle Kisliuk discusses strategies for analyzing and interpreting music. Kisliuk uses her original research with BaAka music and dance from the southwestern Central African Republic's rainforest region to illuminate both the basics of analyzing music—recognizing voice and rhythm in complex musical systems—and the more complex aspects of ethnomusicology—understanding how BaAka music and dance informs that society's social structure and culture. Michelle Kisliuk is Associate Professor of Music at the University of Virginia and specializes in sociomusical dynamics and the ethnography of performance. She is the author of 'Seize the Dance!' BaAka Musical Life and the Ethnography of Performance.

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Other Women's Voices: Translations of Women's Writing Before 1700
Dorothy Disse

This website offers substantial excerpts and more than 120 writings from around the world. Its most valuable feature is this abundant accumulation of texts that women themselves have generated from such a wide array of times and places. The texts span from 2300 BCE to the early 18th century, with... [more]

Website last visited 2004-02-23.

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Railway Women
Helena Wojtczak

This collection consists of photographs of and newsclippings about women railway employees in Britain from before 1915 through the present day. It includes 32 photographs from World War I and 46 photographs from World War II, and a variety of photographs and clippings on topics such as [more]

Website last visited 2004-03-03.

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Emory Women Writers Resource Project
Emory University

This project is a collection of largely unedited texts by female authors from the 17th to the 20th centuries. There are 75 texts, most of them written in English in the United States and Great Britain. The majority of the authors are Caucasian, but the site also includes works by 12 Native... [more]

Website last visited 2004-03-16.

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Gifts of Speech: Women's Speeches from Around the World
Sweet Briar College, Virginia

This site offers an archive of speeches by "influential, contemporary women." Almost all of the speeches in the collection come directly from the authors themselves or from the organizations representing them and have not been published elsewhere. The main focus is the period since 1900, although... [more]

Website last visited 2004-04-23.

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Pauline Johnson Archive
McMaster University

This site is devoted to the life and writings of Emily Pauline Johnson (also known as Tekahionwake). Johnson, the daughter of a Mohawk father and an English mother, was one of Canada's most successful entertainers at the turn of the 20th century, and the first Native poet published in Canada. This... [more]

Website last visited 2004-05-04.

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Women's Library: Suffrage Banners Collection
Arts and Humanities Data Service (AHDS)

This collection offers early 20th-century suffrage banners and associated artwork. There is a short (400 word) introduction to the collection while the collection proper is accessed via the AHDS search engine. Users must [more]

Website last visited 2004-05-12.

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